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STATISTICAL 
ABSTRACT 



BOSTON 



NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 




Maryland Room 
U*4*eiaii> of M«ry4«nd 
Collese P"t M4. 



THE COVER 

AS THE SOUTHERN ANCHOR OF THE NORTHEASTERN 
MEGALOPOLIS REACHING FROM BOSTON TO WASHINGTON, D. C, 
MARYLAND HAS EMERGED AS A DYNAMIC ECONOMIC AREA. 

FAVORABLY SITUATED IN THE MIDST OF A VAST CONSUMER 
MARKET, RAW MATERIALS AND AN EXTENSIVE AIR, LAND AND 
WATER TRANSPORTATION NETWORK, MARYLAND IS IDEALLY 
LOCATED FOR MANUFACTURING, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, 
DISTRIBUTION, RECREATION AND TOURISM. 



DO I OT CIRCUUIK 



PRICE-S2.50 



WILLIAM A. PATE _m JD^. m. TELEPHONE. COLONIAL 8 3371 

DIRECTOR 




STATE OF MARYLAND 
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

state office building 
Annapolis. Maryland 21401 

October 30, 1967 



The Honorable Spiro T. Agnew 
Governor of Maryland 
The State House 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Dear Governor Agnew: 

It is with great pleasure that we transmit to you this report, 
"Maryland Statistical Abstract. " 

This is one in a series of biennial reports which presents a 
statistical record of the composition, changes and trends in the population, 
business, agriculture, natural resources and many other aspects of 
life in Maryland. This report deals in facts and figures, but the 
ultimate concern is with the well-being of the human resources of the 
State Maryland's men, women and children. 

It is hoped that these data will be informative and useful to 
individuals, business firms, and state and local governmental agencies 
in Maryland and elsewhere, and that they will provide the basic informa 
tion necessary to sound decisions on many matters vital to the welfare 
of Maryland's citizens. 

This report is part of the Department's over- all program to 
bring together in this Department the many types of information on 
Maryland's economic resources necessary for effective long-range 
planning and to assist residents and potential investors in Maryland's 
economic opportunities. Supplementing this series of reports are annual 
reports which discuss and analyze a specific and particular aspect of the 
Maryland economy as well as monthly reports dealing with Maryland 
economic indicators. 

Every care has been exercised to ensure the usefulness and accu- 
racy of this publication. We welcome suggestions which will improve the 
utility of future editions and would appreciate having them brought to our 
attention. 

Sincerely, 



(lVa^L CT*9u£*-J2? 



Ralph 'O. Dulany (^ William A. Pate 

Chairman Director 




MARYLAND STATISTICAL 

ABSTRACT 



Published by 

MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 

| 21401 

October, 1967 

Maryland & Rare Book Room 
University Of Maryland Library 
fni i pfip Pa uk. Mn. 






i 



PREFACE 



The well being of Maryland residents depends, in large measure, upon the 
value of the State's human and physical resources. In addition to being a 
function of quality and quantity, the value of resources depends on their 
effective utilization. This report is designed to provide business and 
government leaders and other interested people with a comprehensive picture 
of Maryland's resources in terms of recent development. 

The tables presented here are a compilation of available secondary data 
and are not always consistent due to different sources. Therefore, the 
statistical picture presented here is less an analysis than a statistical 
abstract. The primary purpose of this study was to update The Maryland 
Economy No. 1 - 1962. Modest expansion of the previous report will provide 
additional information about climate, geography, retail and wholesale sales, 
and federal property. The brief summary word pictures and bar figures present 
an overview of the data in the tables. 

This report was developed by the Maryland State Economic Development 
Department with the assistance of the Urban Studies Institute of Morgan State 
College and Strategic Planning Corporation of Baltimore. Homer E. Favor of 
Morgan State College and Blair A. Simon of Strategic Planning Corporation 
were Project Managers. The entire effort was under the direction of Sidney 
Hatkin of the Maryland State Department of Economic Development. 



Table of Contents 



COUNTY -TOWN MAP OF MARYLAND 

SUMMARY 

Number Figures 

1 Percentage Population Growth of Maryland, Selected 
States, and United States Average, 1960-1965 

2 Maryland Population Growth, 1860-1966 

3 Employment in Maryland, 1965, 1960 

4 Rate of Growth of Manufacturing in Maryland and 
Selected Eastern States, 1963, 1958 

5 Manufacturing Employment in Maryland (Principal 
Industries), 1965, 1960 

6 Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland (Principal 
Industries), 1965 

7 Value Added by Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland (Principal Industries), 1963, 1958 

8 Manufacturing and Non -Manufacturing Payrolls in 
Maryland, 1965, 1960 

9 Personal Income in Maryland By Major Source, 1965, 
1960 

10 Personal Income in Maryland and Selected Mid- 
Eastern States 

11 Size of Farms in Maryland, 1964, 1959 

12 Value of Farm Products Sold By Source, 1964, 1959 . . 

13 Number of Commercial Farms In Maryland By Gross 
Sales, 1964, 1959 

14 Number of Commercial Farms in Maryland By Type, 

1964, 1959 

15 Principal Sources of Farm Income By Commodities, 1964 



Page 

1 
2 



14 
15 
16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 
24 
25 

26 

27 
28 



GEOGRAPHY AND CLIMATE 

Number Tables Page 

1 Geographical Region of Maryland Grouped By Counties . . 29 

2 Locations and Elevations of Weather Stations in 
Maryland For Which Climatological Data Are 

Presented, 1966 30 

3 Average Temperature, Precipitation and Snowfall At 

Selected Locations Within the State of Maryland, 1966 . 31 

4 Average Dates of Last Occurrence in Spring and First 
Occurrence in Fall of Temperatures 32°, 24°, and 16° 

F. and Average Lengths of Freeze-Free Periods 35 

POPULATION -- GROWTH, EMPLOYMENT, AND INCOME 

Tables 

5 Population Density of Maryland Counties Ranked By 

Land Area, 1966 36 

6 Population, State of Maryland By Counties and Baltimore 

City, 1966 and 1960 37 

7 Population, State of Maryland By Counties and Baltimore 

City, Rank by 1966 38 

8 Population, State of Maryland, Age Composition By County 39 

9 Population, State of Maryland, By White and Non-White 
Composition, Comparison of 1 July 1966 Estimates and 

1960 Actual ■ 40 

10 Population of the 50 States, Ranked by Percent of Change 
Between 1965 Estimates and 1960 Finals 41 

11 Maryland Population Growth, 1860 Through 1966 43 

12 Population, State of Maryland By Counties and Baltimore 
City, Rank by Percent of Change Between 1966 Estimates 

and 1960 Finals 44 

13 Population of Selected Maryland Towns and Cities, 1965 

and 1950 45 

14 Civilian Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment in 
Maryland, 1965 and 1960 46 

15 Employment Categories As a Percent of Total Employment 

in Maryland, 1965 and 1960 47 



ii 



Number Page 

16 Flow of Income and Expenditures in the United States . . 48 

17 City Worker's Family Budget, Baltimore and Selected 
U. S. Cities, Autumn 1960 and Estimated 1965 

Requirement 49 

18 Personal Income By Major Source, Maryland, 1964 and 1960 50 

19 Total Personal Income, Maryland and Selected Eastern 

States, 1965 and 1960 51 

20 Per Capita Personal Income, Maryland and Selected 

Eastern States, 1965 and 1960 52 

21 Per Household Disposable Income, Maryland and Selected 
Eastern States, 1965 53 

22 Per Household Disposable Income, Maryland and Selected 
Eastern States Whose Top Income Households Outnumber 

the Bottom, 1965 54 

23 Estimated Disposable Income, Per Capita and Per Household, 

By Counties in Maryland, Ranked by Per Capita Income, 1965 55 



NON -AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND EMPLOYMENT 

Tables 

24 Number of Manufacturing Establishments, Maryland and 
Selected Eastern States, Regionally Ranked by Rate of 
Growth, Census of 1958 and 1963 Annual Averages .... 56 

25 Number of Employees Engaged in Manufacturing, Maryland 
and Selected Eastern States, Regionally Ranked by Rate 

of Growth in Total Employees, Census of 1958 and 1963 . 57 

26 Value Added By Manufacturing, Maryland and Selected 
Eastern States, Regionally Ranked by Rate of Growth, 

Census of 1958 and 1963 58 

27 Manufacturing Payrolls, Maryland and Selected Eastern 
States, Regionally Ranked by Rate of Growth, Census of 

1958 and 1963 Annual Averages 59 

28 Manufacturing Employment in Principal Industries in 
Maryland, Rank by Percentage of Change, 1965 and I960 

Annual Averages 60 

29 Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Race of Industry 
Growth, V965/1960 and 1960/1950 61 

30 Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland, 

1964 and 1960 62 



iii 



Number Page 

31 Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland, 1965 and 1960, Rank 

By Dollar Value in 1966 63 

32 Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Average Hourly 
Earnings, 1965 and 1960 64 

33 Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Average Weekly 
Earnings, 1965 and 1960 65 

34 Value Added By Principal Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland, 1963 and 1958, Rank By Dollar Volume in 1963 . 66 

35 Value Added By Manufacturing Industries in Maryland, 

Rank By Percent Change, 1963 to 1958 67 

36 Non-Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Annual Averages, 
1965 and 1960 68 

37 Non-Manufacturing Employment, Including Agricultural and 
Self-Employed, 1965 and 1960, Rank By Percent of Total in 

1965 By Category 69 

38 Non-Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Rank By Percent 
Change, 1965/1960 70 

39 Number of Manufacturing Firms in Maryland, By County, 

1960 Through 1965, 1950 Through 1955, Second Quarter Totals 71 

40 Maryland Retail Trade By County, 1963 72 

41 Maryland Wholesale Trade By County, 1963 73 

42 State and County Employment By Industry, 1960 74 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND EMPLOYMENT 

Tables 

43 Maryland Farm Land, Acreage, and Value, 1964 and 1959. . 79 

44 Farms in Maryland By Size and Ownership, 1964 and 1959 • 80 

45 Value of Farm Products Sold By Source and As Percent 

of Total in Maryland, 1964 and 1959 81 

46 Number of Commercial Farms By Gross Sales in Maryland, 

1964 and 1959 82 

47 Workers on Farms in Maryland, August 1957 Through 1961, 

1962 and 1963 83 



48 Number of Farms in Maryland By Type and As Percent of 
Total, 1964 and 1959 



iv 



84 



Number Page 

49 Principal Sources of Farm Income By Commodities, 1964, 

1963 and 1960 85 

50 Harvest of Principal Crops in Maryland, 1964 and 1959 . 87 

51 Livestock and Poultry, Population and Sales, Maryland, 

1964 and 1959 88 

52 Farm Products Sold in Maryland, 1964 and 1959, Ranked By 
Value Sold in 1964 89 



RECREATION AND TOURISM 

Tables 

53 Acreage and Attendance in Maryland State Parks and 

Forests, 1965 and 1960 90 

54 Number of Hotels, Motels, and Other Tourist Accommodations 

in Maryland for 1963 and 1958 By Counties 91 

55 Hunting and Fishing Licenses in Maryland By Counties, 

1965 and 1960 92 

CONSTRUCTION 

Tables 

56 New Construction Plans, Value By Type, 1965 93 

57 Construction Contracts, Work Actually Done, Value, 

1955, 1960, 1963, 1964 and 1965 94 

58 Value of Construction Contracts Awarded in Maryland, 

1960 Through 1965 95 

59 New Building Permits Authorized in Maryland, 1955, 1959, 

1964 and 1965 96 

TRANSPORTATION 

Tables 

60 Total Highway Mileage By Type of System in Maryland, 

1965 and 1960 97 

61 Maryland Highway Mileage By Type of Road, 1965 and 1960 98 

62 Motor Vehicle Registration By Type in Maryland, 1965 

and 1960 99 

63 Average Daily Vehicle Miles, State Maintained Roads, 

1965 and 1959 100 

v 



Number Page 

64 Traffic Volume At Toll Facilities in Maryland, 1955 

Through 1965 Annual Totals 101 

65 Waterborne Commerce of Maryland's Principal Waterways, 
Excluding the Port of Baltimore and Including the Port of 
Baltimore, 1964 and 1959 . 102 

66 Total Waterborne Commerce of the Port of Baltimore, 
Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 103 

67 Ranking of Principal U. S. Seaports in Foreign Waterborne 
Trade, Exports and Imports 104 

68 Ranking of Principal U. S. Seaports in Foreign Waterborne 
Trade, Total Foreign Trade 105 

69 Import and Export Tonnage and Value For the Port of 
Baltimore, 1955 Through 1965 106 

70 Value of Principal Categories of Commodities Exported 

From and Imported Into the Port of Baltimore, 1965 . . . 107 

71 Leading Commodities in Total Waterborne Commerce For 

Port of Baltimore, 1964 108 

72 Distribution of Export Cargo Shipped From the Port of 
Baltimore, Arranged By Principal Countries In Order of 
Tonnage and By Trade Areas 109 

73 Import Trade of the Port of Baltimore, Arranged By 
Principal Countries In Order of Tonnage and By Trade Areas 110 

74 Friendship International Airport, 1965 and 1960 .... Ill 

75 Commercial Airports, State of Maryland, 1965 112 

76 Commercial Airports and Heliports in the State of 

Maryland, 1965, By County 113 



UTILITIES 



Tables 



77 Installed Generating Capacity and Production of Electric 
Utilities and Industrial Plants in Maryland, By Class of 
Ownership and Type of Prime Mover, 1964 and 1959 .... 114 

78 Gas Utility Industry in Maryland, Customers and Revenues, 

1964 and 1959 115 

79 Telephone System in Maryland, Selected Data, 1966 . . . 116 



vi 



NATURAL RESOURCES 

Number Tables Page 

80 Forest Land Area in Maryland and Neighboring States 

and the Continental U. S. for 1963 117 

81 Commercial Forest Land Ownership By Type of Owner in 
Maryland and Neighboring States and Continental U. S. 

for 1963 118 

82 Net Volume of Growing Stock and Sawtimber on Commercial 
Forest Land By Ownership and Net Annual Growth in Maryland 
and Neighboring States and Continental U. S. for 1963 

and 1962 119 

83 Commercial Forest Land Area By Stand-Size Class in 
Maryland and Neighboring States and Continental U. S. 

for 1963 120 

84 Net Volume of Live Sawtimber in Sawtimber Stands on 
Commercial Forest Land in Maryland and Neighboring 

States and Continental U. S. for 1963 121 

85 Net Volume of Live Sawtimber and Growing Stock on 
Commercial Forest Lands in Maryland By Species Group, 
January 1, 1963 122 

86 Estimated Commercial Timber Cut, 1963 123 

87 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Growing Stock on 
Commercial Forest Land By Species Group, 1962 124 

88 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Live Sawtimber on 
Commercial Forest Land By Species Group, 1962 125 

89 Number of Forest Fires and Area Burned in Maryland, 

1965 and 1960 126 

90 Forest Fires in Maryland By Cause for Fiscal Year 1965 . 127 

91 Value of Mineral Production in Maryland By Counties, 

1964, 1963 and 1960 128 

92 Mineral Products in Maryland for 1964, 1963 and 1960 . . 129 

93 Maryland Fish Catch By Dollar Value, 1965, 1960, 1955 

and 1950 130 

94 Maryland Fish Catch By Quantity, 1950 Through 1964 ... 131 

95 Maryland Seafood Products By Value, 1950 Through 1964 . 132 

96 Maryland Seafood Products By Quantity, 1950 Through 1964 133 

97 Fishermen and Gear in Maryland, 1964, 1960, 1955 and 

1950 134 

vii 



EDUCATION 

Number Tables Page 

98 Number of Schools in Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 .... 135 

99 Number of Teachers in Maryland Schools, 1955 Through 1964 136 

100 Number of Pupils Attending Public and Non-Public Schools 

in Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 137 

101 Public School Enrollment, Total Elementary and High 
School, Enrollments By County in Maryland, 1965, 1964 

and 1960 138 

102 Cost Per Pupil Belonging, Kindergarten Through Grade 12, 
All Current Expenses Including Administration, Maryland 
Public Day Schools, 1955 Through 1964 139 

103 Average Annual Salary Per Teacher and Principal, Public 
Schools in Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 140 

104 Average Number of Pupils Belonging Per Teacher and 
Principal in Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 141 

105 Public High School Graduates in Maryland, 1955 Through 1964 142 

106 Number and Percent of Maryland High School Graduates 
Continuing Education Year Following Graduation, 1955 

Through 1963 143 

107 Source of Revenue For Current Expenses, Maryland Public 
Schools, For Year Ending June 30, 1964 144 

108 Disbursements For Current Expenses, Debt Service, and 
Capital Outlay, Maryland Public Schools, 1955 Through 1964 145 

109 Capital Outlay Expenditures By Maryland Local Boards of 
Education, Year Ending June 30, 1964 146 

110 Enrollment in State Accredited Colleges and Universities 

of Maryland, 1966 147 

111 Two-Year State Accredited Colleges in Maryland, 1966 . . 149 

112 Four-Year State Accredited Colleges and Universities in 
Maryland, 1966 150 



STATE FINANCE 



Tables 



113 State of Maryland, Net Cash Expenditures, Fiscal Years 

1965, 1964 and 1960 151 



viii 



Number Page 

114 State of Maryland, Net Cash Receipts, Fiscal Years 

1965, 1964 and 1960 152 

115 General Fund Surplus Account in Maryland, Fiscal 

Years 1965, 1964 and 1960 153 



FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

Tables 

116 All Active Banks in Maryland, Summary of Assets and 
Liabilities, 1965 and 1960 154 

117 All Active National Banks in Maryland, Summary of 

Assets and Liabilities, 1965 and 1960 155 

118 All Active State Commercial Banks in Maryland, Summary 

of Assets and Liabilities, 1965 and 1960 156 

119 All Active Mutual Savings Banks in Maryland, Summary 

of Assets and Liabilities, 1965 and 1960 157 

120 Industrial Finance Companies in Maryland, 1965 and 1960 158 

121 Credit Unions in Maryland, 1965 and 1960 159 

U. S. GOVERNMENT PROPERTY 

Tables 

122 Real Property Leased To the Federal Government and 
Federally Owned Real Property in Maryland, 1957, 1960, 

1965 and 1966 160 

SCIENCE -INDUSTRY COMPLEX 

Tables 

123 Federal Research and Development Obligations, U.S. and 
Maryland, Fiscal Year 1965 161 



ix 



MARYLAND No. 651* 



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SUMMARY 
MARYLAND - AMERICA IN MINIATURE 



The popular slogan describing the State of Maryland as "America in Miniature" 
is indeed plausible considering the State's geographic, demographic and economic 
diversification. Maryland ranges from the Atlantic Seaboard on the East to the 
Appalachian Mountains bordering America's Mid-West. In between these boundaries 
lies a striking variety of climate and terrain and the huge Chesapeake Bay. The 
economic structure ranges from the nation's most affluent suburban county to the 
heavilly industrialized area of metropolitan Baltimore; to the Appalachian economy 
of parts of Western Maryland; and the rural southern character of the Eastern 
Shore and Southern Maryland. Although there is no standard uniformly acceptable 
regional designation, the State Planning Department has divided Maryland into 
the following major sections: 



1. All of Metropolitan Baltimore: 



2. Western Maryland: 



3. Suburban Metropolitan Washington: 



4. Southern Maryland: 



5. The Eastern Shore: 



6. Northern Maryland: 



Baltimore City 
Anne Arundel County 
Baltimore County 
Howard County 
Harford County 
Carroll County 

Frederick County 
Washington County 
Allegany County 
Garrett County 

Montgomery County 
Prince George's County 

Charles County 
St. Mary's County 
Calvert County 

Kent County 
Queen Anne's County 
Talbot County 
Caroline County 
Dorchester County 
Wicomico County 
Somerset County 
Worcester County 

Cecil County 



Area 

Maryland is not a large state, ranking 42nd out of 50 in terms of land 
area. Its 23 counties, plus Baltimore City, total 9,887 square miles of land 
area. Inland water area constitutes 703 square miles; the Chesapeake Bay 
consists of 1,726 square miles. The total land and water area is 12,303 square 
miles. Geographically, however, Maryland is in a strategic position in a rapidly 
developing urban complex between Boston and Washington, D.C. Due to an unusual 
configuration, Maryland also occupies a key position in numerous transportation 
routes. 

It should be noted that Baltimore City is entirely separate from Baltimore 
County, both by government and by land mass. With the exception of Baltimore 
City, which is a compact 79 square miles, the other political sub-divisions are 
rather similar in size, with the largest counties being only three times the 
total area of the smallest counties and the average county size running approx- 
imately 450 square miles. 

Climate 

Maryland's climate has been described as moderate- -more typical of the 
Northeastern United States than the South. 

The elevation of the State of Maryland shows significant variation from 
section to section, generally varying from sea level at the coast to over 3,300 
feet at Backbone Mountain in Garrett County. Differences in climate are more 
attributable to elevation, topography, and surrounding water bodies than to 
differences in latitude. 



Population 

Maryland State population has grown at a rapid rate in the past five years. 
In recent years, Maryland has been the fifth fastest growing state in the United 
States. Figure 1 shows that Maryland's growth during the 1960-1965 period fell 
only slightly behind that of California and Florida and slightly ahead of 
Delaware. The rate of growth for this period was substantially higher than the 
8.5 percent average of all 50 states. Moreover, the 1966 population estimate of 
3,632,140 suggests an intensifying growth rate. Figure 2 illustrates the 
acceleration of state population growth in recent years. 

Individual county growth showed a considerable variation, with Prince 
George's County leading with a 57.3 percent increase. Howard County follows 
with a 37.7 percent increase between 1960 and 1966, and Anne Arundel, Harford, 
and Montgomery counties are not far behind at approximately 28.0 percent gain each. 

The counties with greatest population increases are all situated in the 
Suburban Metropolitan Washington and Metropolitan Baltimore regions. The 
magnitude of these suburban population increases suggests that the Maryland 
experience is consistent with the urban population shifts characteristic of 
the nation. Baltimore City has virtually run out of land for additional 
housing and its population remains relatively constant (slight decline). 
However, with the exception of Baltimore City, the political sub-divisions 
with smaller than average growth were predominantly rural. 



The demographic aspects of the population changes are rather revealing. 
The age groups are disaggregated into only three categories, under 18 years, 
18 thru 64 years, and over 64 years. The youthful classification showed the 
largest increase, growing 17.7 percent from 1960 to 1965. The corresponding 
figure for the senior resident category, 13.9 percent, is slightly higher than 
the 12.5 percent increase for the 18 thru 64 year age group. This suggests 
that Maryland is experiencing burgeoning expansion of its youthful population 
and that greater longevity for the elderly is showing continued improvement. 
It is interesting to note, however, that these growth patterns are not reflected 
uniformly in all of the political sub-divisions. For example, the loss in 
Baltimore City population, 1.7 percent for the five-year period 1960-1965, 
is entirely within the 18 thru 64 year age group. This age group also 
experiences a decline in Somerset County. Although there is an increase in 
Baltimore's youth population, 4.0 percent, it is considerably lower than the 
corresponding rate of 13.3 percent for adjacent Baltimore County. The signif- 
icance of these observations becomes more meaningful by relating them to the 
demographic characteristic of race. 

Baltimore City contains the State's largest concentration of non-white 
citizens. The previously mentioned net loss in Baltimore City's 18 thru 64 
year age category apparently reflects the effects of out migration of white 
families to the suburbs. The net population loss for the city was small 
because of a sizable increase in non-white population to almost offset the 
loss of white middle-aged people. In most other areas of the State both 
white and non-white population have grown simultaneously. 



Industry and Employment 



Industry and business have prospered in Maryland. Correspondingly, 
employment opportunities have grown. The major share of the growth in the 
1960 to 1965 time period was in the non -manufacturing sectors. Non -manufacturing 
employment now generates over 65 percent of the total employment opportunities in 
the State. Manufacturing employment grew only slightly while agricultural 
employment declined almost 25 percent. There has been a significant expansion 
of government services in the area, which in turn has resulted in an increase 
in employment opportunities. Currently, the government sector provides over 
25 percent of all jobs in Maryland. Figure 3 illustrates the employment 
picture by source in Maryland for 1960 and 1965. 

Manufacturing - Manufacturing has not been the primary cause of real 
economic growth in the State of Maryland in recent years; rather it has been 
non-manufacturing services that have primarily contributed to Maryland's economic 
boom. However, Maryland has had a slight growth in the number of manufacturing 
establishments between 1958 and 1963. Maryland's position compares favorably 
with most other mid-Eastern states. New Jersey has had a much higher rate in 
the growth of number of firms, while Delaware and New Jersey have both had 
greater increases in value added by manufacturing. On the other hand, Maryland 
manufacturing has fared better than Hew York's, which has seen a drop in the 
number of firms and the number of employees in manufacturing during the same 
time period. Figure 4 illustrates the growth in manufacturing in Maryland 
and selected mid-Eastern states during this time period. Maryland's growth 
in number of manufacturing firms and manufacturing employment appears to be 
somewhat behind most of the southeastern states, especially Virginia, North 
Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia. 



In the 1960 to 1965 time period, three industries stood out for their 
rapid growth in manufacturing employment. These are rubber and miscellaneous 
plastic products, printing and publishing, and machinery, excluding electrical, 
all of which had a greater than 20 percent increase in manufacturing employment. 
In the previous decade, 1950 to 1960, the largest Maryland growth occurred in the 
electrical machinery and pulp, paper and paper products industries. A 
notable difference between the 1950' s and the 1960 's is that rubber and 
miscellaneous plastic products have come forth to replace electrical machinery 
as the growth leader. Figure 5 illustrates the Maryland manufacturing 
employment picture by principal industries for the 1960 to 1965 time period. 
Consistent growth industries appear to include: printing and publishing; 
pulp, paper and paper products; stone, clay, and glass products; and machinery, 
excluding electrical. 

Despite a rather stable manufacturing employment level, manufacturing 
payrolls increased significantly in the 1958 to 1963 time period. This can 
be principally attributed to increases in wages and salaries. Maryland's 
manufacturing payroll rose 23.5 percent during this time period, which is 
somewhat less than New Jersey and Delaware but more than Pennsylvania and 
New York. 

The largest manufacturing payrolls in the State of Maryland are in the 
primary metals, the food and kindred products, and the transportation equipment 
industries. Chemicals and chemical products, printing and publications, along 
with machinery, except electrical, and apparel and related products trail 
significantly behind these three leaders. The primary rnetals industry has 
far and away the largest payroll and is almost double the second largest 
industry payroll of food and kindred products. Interestingly, apparel and 
related products is the third largest industrial classification in terms of 
numbers of employees but the seventh largest in terms of payroll due to 
substantially lower-than-average wage rates. Figure 6 illustrates the size 
of manufacturing payrolls in Maryland by principal industries for 1965. 

The same three industries that dominate manufacturing payrolls also 
dominate value added by manufacturing industries in the State of Maryland. 
Primary metal products, transportation equipment, and food and kindred products 
are significantly ahead of other industries. Interestingly, transportation 
equipment has a relatively greater impact in value added than in manufacturing 
payrolls. This is probably due to the substantial professional payrolls of 
the aerospace industry. Value added data shows that electrical machinery 
and chemicals and related products have also made relatively larger contribu- 
tions in value added. This may be due to the fact that these industries 
employ substantial professional payrolls. Figure 7 presents the value added 
by manufacturing industries in Maryland by principal industries for the time 
periods 1958 and 1963. 

Non-Manufacturing - The non-manufacturing sector of the Maryland economy 
has been the main source of Maryland's dynamic growth in recent years. Principal 
elements of non-manufacturing employment are: government, wholesale and retail 
trade, general services, contract construction, finance, insurance, and real 
estate, as well as communications and public utilities. The largest non- 
manufacturing Maryland payrolls are government and wholesale and retail trade. 
Figure 8 illustrates the breakdown by classification of non-manufacturing 
payrolls in Maryland for the 1960 and 1964 time period. 



Most categories of non-manufacturing employment have been seen and continue 
to see rapid growth in terms of employment (rather than payroll). The fastest 
growth has occurred in service and miscellaneous which includes business, health 
and personal services. Of all the non-manufacturing employment categories, only 
railroad transportation and agricultural employment has shown a decline in recent 
years. 

Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Data By County - The total number of 
manufacturing firms has grown in recent years. Baltimore City has always been 
the dominant location of manufacturing firms in Maryland. Although the total 
number of firms has declined in Baltimore City, it still contains over 40 percent 
of all manufacturing firms in the State of Maryland. The other leaders, which 
are far behind, are Baltimore County, Prince George's County, Montgomery County, 
Washington County and Anne Arundel County. All, with the exception of Washington 
County, are located in the major metropolitan areas. 

Baltimore City likewise dominates retail trade, having over 1/3 of all 
retail trade establishments in the State of Maryland and somewhat less than 
1/3 of all retail sales. 

To an even greater degree Baltimore City dominates Maryland wholesale 
trade, with more than 50 percent of the number of wholesale establishments 
and approximately 50 percent of all wholesale sales in the state. 

Each Maryland county has its own dominant industries. Several counties 
have heavy employment in the Armed Forces, including Anne Arundel, Cecil, 
Harford, and St. Mary's counties. Others are notable for relatively large 
agricultural employment, such as Carroll County, Frederick County, and most 
of the Eastern Shore counties. Prince George's and Montgomery counties have 
particularly strong employment in public administration due to their proximity 
to Washington. Baltimore City is notable for its heavy employment in 
manufacturing and production industries. 



Personal Income 

Personal income gains were largely in the non -manufacturing sector. 
The largest increases took place in government civilian employment, where 
both federal and state and local payrolls grew substantially. Figure 9 shows 
the makeup of personal income in Maryland for 1965 in comparison with 1960. 

During the same time period, personal income in Maryland grew faster 
than any of the states in the mid-Eastern region and in the Southeastern 
United States. Comparative personal income growth for the mid-Eastern states 
is illustrated in Figure 10. Of the Southeastern states, Virginia's and Georgia's 
rate almost equaled Maryland at just under 45 percent each for the same time 
period. In per capita personal income growth for the same time period, Maryland's 
rate fell slightly below a number of the Southeastern states including Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. In average 
per household disposable income, Maryland ranks only behind Delaware of the 
mid-East and Southeastern states. Household disposable income is highest in 
the metropolitan areas. Suburban Washington's disposable income leads with 
Montgomery County having the highest average disposable income of any county 
in the United States. Anne Arundel, Howard and Baltimore counties are close 
behind at almost $10,000 per household per year. 



Agriculture 

Maryland, like most other areas of the United States and particularly 
the "megalopolis" states, has been undergoing a shift from rural agricultural 
living and employment to urban manufacturing and service employment. The land 
devoted to farming and the number of farms have been declining steadily. Figure 
11 illustrates the decline in the number of farms by size for 1964 relative to 
1959. All size farms, except the very largest (e.g. 500 acres or more), have 
declined. It appears that the future lies mainly in the highly-organized and 
highly-mechanized farming operations. 

The value of farm products sold continues to increase due both to increases 
in actual production as well as a slight price increase. The average value of 
product per farm increased 44.4 percent between 1959 and 1964. Only livestock 
products other than poultry and poultry products declined in terms of value of 
output during this period. Figure 12 illustrates the breakdown of farm product 
sales for 1959 and 1964 in the State of Maryland. 

Despite the movement towards larger farms, the number of farms in Maryland 
grossing $10,000 or more per year actually showed a small decrease in the 1959 
to 1964 time period. At the same time, there was a slight increase in the number 
of marginal farms grossing less than $2,500 per year. This is illustrated in 
Figure 13. 

Although the total number of commercial farms in the State decreased in 
recent years, there has been some increase in the farms specializing in field 
crops and also vegetable farms. The largest decrease has been in the number 
of poultry farms, dairy farms, other livestock farms. Since poultry and poultry 
products have shown a substantial increase in value during the same time period, 
the decline in the number of poultry farms is mainly attributable to consolidation 
and larger scale operations. Figure 14 illustrates the number of commercial farms 
by type for 1959 and 1964. 

The largest sources of farm income are livestock products, which account 
for more than 2/3 of the value of all agricultural commodities. In Maryland 
the dominance of this category is principally due to dairy products and poultry. 
Cattle and calves, eggs and hogs are important, but substantially smaller elements. 
Field crops account for approximately 20 percent and are led by tobacco, corn and 
soy beans, while vegetables and melons, as well as greenhouse and nursery products, 
are also important sources of farm income in the State of Maryland. Figure 15 
illustrates the principal sources of farm income by major commodities in 1964. 

Recreation and Tourism 

With the rapid rise in leisure time, there has been a corresponding 
increase in recreation and tourism facilities and activity. Much of this 
growth has taken place since 1950 and in recent years continued, but began to 
take on some different patterns. Most notable is the increase in sport hunting 
and fishing activities, where in the five years between 1960 and 1965 there has 
been an increase of almost 40 percent in the number of hunting licenses in 
Maryland and an increase of 25 percent in the number of fresh water fishing 
licenses. Studies have claimed that sport fishermen in Maryland catch from 
two to four times as many fish as does the commercial fishing industry. 
Maryland's multitude of water recreation areas are increasingly used by 
sportsmen for fishing, hunting and other pleasure activities. 



Maryland's State parks are striving to keep pace with the demand for 
leisure activities by adding new land and especially new facilities to improve 
the utilization of their State parks and forests. In the 1960 to 1965 time 
period, there was an increase of more than 10 percent in the land area for 
State parks and forests. Recorded attendance has also shown a slight increase. 

Tourism and business travel in the State are believed to be increasing 
rapidly. Because Maryland, by its geographical location, is a state which many 
people must pass through to get to such attractions as the Nation's Capitol, 
New York City and the seashores, tourism is a significant (but difficult to 
estimate) factor in the Maryland economy. Further, the new national park on 
Assateague Island should contribute to a major increase in tourism. 

Contrary to increased travel trends, the number of hotels and motels and 
other tourist facilities has declined slightly in the 1958 to 1963 time period. 
This is probably mainly attributable to thp fact that small obsolete units 
are being eliminated and replaced by larger, more modern facilities. 



Construction 

Maryland has been seeing a rapid growth in new construction since World 
War II. Maryland's total construction average per year is running at 2.4 
percent of the total United States construction, which is substantially greater 
than its population and personal income as a percentage of United States totals, 
Construction, therefore, is a major indicator of Maryland's healthy economic 
growth. The most remarkable growth in Maryland construction has occurred in 
commercial, residential and non-residential construction, which in 1965 
accounted for approximately 75 percent of the total value of construction. 



Transportation 

The major boom in transportation across the country in recent years has 
been the personal automobile. Maryland is no exception, and this is accompanied 
by similar growth in highway mileage, automobile ownership, and average daily 
vehicle miles. The traffic volume at state toll bridges and tunnels is up 
appreciably and in some cases utilization is approaching capacity and new 
facilities are planned or under construction. 

Maryland has substantial waterfront areas, both on the Atlantic Ocean 
and most especially the Chesapeake Bay. The Port of Baltimore is a well- 
equipped deepwater port that ranks among the ation's leaders. There are also 
a number of smaller waterways which account for approximately 3 percent of 
Maryland's waterborne commerce, while the Port of Baltimore accounts for 97 
percent of the state's waterborne commerce. 

The Port of Baltimore's activity in the past ten years appears to have 
been relatively stable. The number of vessel arrivals in 1964 is approximately 
equal to 1955. The value of shipments has increased; however, the number of 
passengers and the tonnage handled have declined slightly. 

Baltimore ranks as the third largest foreign trade port in the United 
States in terms of total tonnage (exports plus imports) . Baltimore is chiefly 
a bulk shipment rather than general cargo port, which is primarily routed 
through New York. Only Philadelphia and New York rank ahead of Baltimore in 



total tonnage handled for foreign shipments; however, Norfolk, Newport News, 
New Orleans and Houston rank ahead of Baltimore in exports. Baltimore's 
tonnage is largely due to imports which account for approximately 3/4 of 
the tonnage handled. 

The major commodities handled by the Port of Baltimore are machinery 
and transport equipment, miscellaneous manufactured articles, crude materials, 
inedibles except fuels, and food and live animals. Although the import tonnage 
is substantially greater than the export, the value of exports is almost 
equivalent to the value of imports. This rough equality is due to the fact 
that exports are predominantly sophisticated machinery and devices, where 
imports are principally bulk commodities and raw materials. 

The Port of Baltimore also handles substantial quantities of coast- 
wise United States shipping, principally petroleum products. Internal and 
local commerce is largely made up of shipments of bitumenous coal and 
lignite. 

The principal countries of lading on foreign shipments are Venezuela, 
Canada, Liberia, and Chile in terms of tonnage; while West Germany and the 
United Kingdom, along with Peru and the Republic of South Africa, dominate 
in terms of dollar value. European countries have a clear lead in terms of 
value of foreign commerce, whereas South American countries are predominant 
in terms of tonnage of trade. 

The major growth in modern travel has been in the utilization of the 
airplane. Baltimore's Friendship International Airport activity reflects this 
rapid growth. The time period 1960 to 1965 shows the total number of passengers 
handled increased 140 percent. The amount of freight increased 201 
percent for the same time period. The number of small planes in usage has 
also been increasing at a rapid rate and Maryland now has a large number of 
commercial airports that can be found in practically every county of the State. 

Utilities 

The need for energy has been increasing at a fantastic rate. Installed 
electrical generating capacity in Maryland has increased over 65 percent in 
the five years between 1959 and 1964. The largest share of this is due to 
electrical utilities. Maryland now has nuclear powered electric plants and 
plans have been made to build more nuclear plants in the future. The owner- 
ship of electrical utilities lies mostly in private hands, with over 76 percent 
privately owned. A similar demand for gas utility energy has taken place in 
the same time period. The number of customers has increased only 14.6 percent 
between 1959 and 1964; however, the total revenues have increased 40 percent 
during that time period, indicating an increase in the per customer usage 
of gas. 

The telephone also continues to play an increasingly dominant role in 
business and personal communication. There are more than one million telephone 
accounts in the State of Maryland with over 1.8 million telephones. It is 
likely that future years will see continued expansion in the use of telephones, 
particularly for data processing and retailing, improved international com- 
munications via satellite, and the advent of the telephone-television 
combination. 



Natural Resources 

Forty-three percent of Maryland's total land area is classified as 
forest land. Although this is somewhat less than Pennsylvania's and Virginia's 
proportion, it is greater than Delaware's and greater than the national 
average of 33 percent of all land area. A major share of this forest land 
is termed commercial forest land which includes all privately owned and 
also public park land. The forest land is largely (91 percent) in private 
hands with approximately 8 percent of all forest land in the State being 
publicly owned. 

Over 75 percent of the State's timber is classified as hardwood and the 
State Board of Natural Resources estimates that 188 million board feet of 
lumber are cut per year by the State's 192 sawmills. The forest land of 
Maryland and its timber are threatened annually by forest fires. The number 
of forest fires has increased substantially in the past five years with 652 
accounted for in 1965, which burned a total area of over 2,600 acres. 

Mineral products in the State of Maryland were valued at almost $74 million 
in 1964. Accounting for almost 90 percent of this total were stone, cement, 
lime, and sand and gravel. 

Due to Maryland's location on both the Atlantic Ocean and the huge 
Chesapeake Bay which touches many of the State's counties, seafood is an 
important Maryland resource. Since the sport fishing harvest is substantially 
greater than that of commercial fishermen, the data in the tables greatly 
understates the annual catch. The Department of Interior reports that the 
Maryland fish catch in 1965 totaled over $13 million. The largest share of 
this was in oyster and shellfish, particularly oysters, crabs and clams. 
It is estimated that there are more than 9,000 fishermen in the State with 
over 6,000 boats and 63,000 crab pots. The leading fish catch in value are 
striped bass (rock) and white perch. 

Education 

As in every other area of the country, education has received a great 
deal of attention in recent years. The number of children entering elementary 
school is at an all time high, not only due to the population increases, but 
also due to the very high rate of child birth in the late 1950' s. The number 
of schools in Maryland has increased by almost 18 percent in the past ten 
years. The number of teachers has increased still more --approximately 75 
percent in the same time period. While the number of pupils has increased 
slightly less than 60 percent during this period, the Maryland State 
Department of Education reports that in 1965 there were 730,000 pupils in 
Maryland public schools. This was a 25 percent increase over 1960 enrollment. 
The Department of Education also reports that the cost per pupil has almost 
doubled in the past ten years and in 1964 was $437 per pupil. The average 
annual salary to teachers has been one element of added cost and has increased 
50 percent during the same time period. Significantly, during this same 
time period, the number of students per teacher had decreased from 
26.8 to 23.3 percent. 






10 



Maryland high school graduates in 1964 numbered over 34,000, an increase 
of 126 percent over 1955. Each year a greater proportion of Maryland high 
school graduates go on to college. Over 35 percent of Maryland high school 
graduates in 1963 continued into higher education. 

Enrollment in Maryland higher education institutions has reflected the 
strong trend toward more higher education. An estimated 7,850 full-time 
day students in 1966 were enrolled in Maryland's 18 two-year colleges. 
Including evening and part-time students, the two-year colleges had 15,628 
students in 1966. The State has 29 four-year colleges and universities 
with a full-time day student enrollment of over 45,000. More than 25,000 
part-time students, plus 12,000 graduate students, bring the total enrollment 
in 1966 to over 82,000 students. All total, 31,000 college students were 
enrolled on a part-time basis, plus 63,000 on a full-time basis, for a total 
of almost 100,000 college students enrolled in Maryland higher education 
institutions. 

The largest higher education institution in the State is the University 
of Maryland with a total student enrollment of over 38,000 representing 
almost 40 percent of the State's higher education enrollment.. 



State Finance 

Maryland's 1965 State expenditures totaled $721,577,000. Of this total, 
30 percent went towards education, 22 percent towards highways, and 9 percent 
towards health, hospitals and mental hygiene. Ten percent went to public 
welfare. In the same time period, the State of Maryland took in $724,890,000 
of which 23 percent came from income tax, 15.7 percent from retail sales 
taxes, 11 percent from gasoline, 9 percent from motor vehicle registration, 
14.7 percent from federal grants, and 6.7 percent from bond issues. The 
expenditures have increased approximately 58.0 percent over 1960, while 
revenues have increased at the same rate. 



Banking 

The number of active banks in the State decreased by 20 percent 
between 1960 and 1965. This is largely attributable to a number of bank 
mergers, particularly small banks that were made branches of larger institu- 
tions. The total assets or liabilities also decreased slightly by 7 percent. 
The major change occurred in State commercial banks rather than national 
banks. The number of State banks dropped from 83 to 56 during that time 
period. During the same period, industrial finance companies increased by 
36 percent (257 to 350) and their total assets or liabilities rose 95 
percent to $258 million. The number of credit unions decreased 10 percent 
from 43 to 39 during the same time period. Their total assets or liabilities 
are $36 million. 



U. S. Government Property 

The United States Government owns and leases substantial land area 
and buildings in the State of Maryland. The size of federal operations 
is at least partly due to the proximity of Maryland to Washington, D.C. 



11 



In 1965 the federal government owned over 185,000 acres and leased an additional 
3,000 acres of property. In addition, they owned 11,926 buildings and leased an 
additional 684 buildings. Federal government properties in Maryland have shown 
rather substantial increases in recent years. 

Science-Industry Complex 

Maryland is one of five dominant science centers in the United States and is 
probably the fastest growing research and development center in the nation. Part 
of this dominance may be attributed to Maryland's location. The Free State surrounds 
the Nation's Capitol which is also recognized as the science center of the world. 

However, there are other factors besides proximity to the Nation's Capitol 
which makes Maryland an attractive place for science industry. The most important 
of these is its educational institutions. Heading these are the University of 
Maryland, located in the Washington Metropolitan Area, and the Johns Hopkins 
University in the Baltimore Metropolitan Area. In the nearby District of Columbia 
are the American University, Catholic University, George Washington University, 
Georgetown University, and Howard University, which, together with the former 
two, provide excellent educational opportunities in science and engineering 
(both degree programs and continuing education) for the full-time employee. 

For undergraduates, in addition to the two universities, there are 27 4- 
year colleges and 18 2 -year colleges in Maryland which provide higher education, 
both public and private, at campuses within commuting distance from almost all 
communities throughout the state. 

Other factors are excellent transportation facilities by air, land and sea 
to people and markets all over the world; a highly diversified industrial complex 
to provide supporting services for science industry; modern zoning regulations 
to provide campus -type industrial sites; and excellent housing, cultural and 
recreational facilities within easy driving distance of each other and places 
of business. 

It is often said that like things attract like things. The current Directory 
of Science Resources for Maryland lists 37 federal R&D installations in Maryland. 
Many of these are large nationally -known laboratories -- National Institutes of 
Health which employs 11,623 persons, of whom 2,992 are scientists; Agricultural 
Research Center with 2,800 employees, of whom 1,250 are scientists; Atomic Energy 
Commission Headquarters; NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; and many important 
laboratories of the Army, Navy and Air Force. 

More important is the 363 R&D firms listed in this directory. Their total 
employment is 79,809 persons, of whom 16,758 are professionals, 43 of these 
firms located in Maryland during 1964 and 1965. Evidence of the dynamic growth 
of this science complex is the fact that, during this same two-year period, 35 
of the 323 firms previously listed showed a 50% or more increase in employment. 

The total federal R&D obligations for FY 1965, in Maryland, were $876,6 
million of 6.1% of the national total of $14,356.8 million. This placed Maryland 
in third position following California and New York, among the 50 states. The 
accompanying table gives a breakdown of this figure by performer and by the 
federal agencies providing the funds. 



12 



Conclusions 

The record of growth and prosperity for Maryland is indeed impressive. The 
future promises to hold further opportunity, but also raises the challenge of 
making wise decisions and choices. Review of the data presented in this report 
helps to identify some of the needs for better information to guide decision 
makers. More disaggregated data by county — precise locale, race, age, etc. — 
are obvious needs. Also needed is more information on employment, unemployment, 
training, land use, construction, research and development, health and welfare, 
educational achievement, housing, new plant and equipment, and migration. 
Maryland, if it is to remain a leading state in terms of economic growth, will 
continue to develop improved information. 



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28 



No. 1 GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS OF MARYLAND GROUPED BY COUNTIES 



Sub-Region #1 - Baltimore Area 

Baltimore City 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore County 
Howard 
Harford 
Carroll 

#2 - Western Maryland 

Frederick 
Washington 
Allegany 
Garrett 

#3 - Washington Suburbs 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 

#4 - Southern Maryland 

Charles 
St. Mary's 
Calvert 

#5 - Eastern Shore 

Kent 

Queen Anne ' s 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

Worcester 

#6 - Northern Maryland 

Cecil 



Note: Planning Regions - Maryland State Planning Department 



29 



No. 2 



LOCATIONS AND ELEVATIONS OF WEATHER STATIONS IN MARYLAND 
FOR WHICH CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA ARE PRESENTED, 1966 



Station 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 
(Friendship 
International 
Airport) 

Cambridge 

Chestertown 

College Park 

Cumberland 

Easton 

Elkton 

Hagerstown 
(Chewsville- 
Bridgeport) 

Hancock 

Oakland 

Salisbury 

Solomons 

Westminster 



County 



Anne Arundel 



Anne Arundel 

Dorchester 

Kent 

Prince George's 

Allegany 

Talbot 

Cecil 



Washington 

Washington 

Garrett 

Wicomico 

Calvert 

Carroll 



Latitude 
(north) 

38° 59' 



39° 11' 
38° 34' 
39° 13' 
38° 59' 
39° 39' 
38° 45' 
39° 36' 



39° 38' 
39° 42' 
39° 42' 
38° 22' 
38° 19* 
39° 33' 



Longitude 
(west) 

76° 30' 



76° 40* 

76° 09* 

76° 04' 

76° 56* 

78° 45' 

76° 04' 

75° 50' 



77° 41' 
78° 11' 
79° 24' 
75° 35' 
76° 27' 
76° 59' 



Elevation 
(feet) 

40 



148 

5 

35 

70 

945 
40 
28 



560 

428 

2,420 

10 

12 

810 



Source: Submitted by U.S. Weather Bureau, State Climatologist , Environmental 

Science Services Administration, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 



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35 



No. 5 POPULATION DENSITY OF MARYLAND COUNTIES RANKED BY LAND AREA, 1966 



County 

Maryland 

Garrett 

Frederick 

Baltimore 

Dorchester 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Worcester 

Washington 

Charles 

Carroll 

Harford 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Wicomico 

Queen Anne' s 

St. Mary's 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Kent 

Talbot 

Howard 

Calvert 

Baltimore City 



1/ 

Area in 
Sq. Mi. 

9,874 

662 
664 
608 

580 
493 
485 
483 
462 
458 
453 
448 
426 
417 
380 
373 
367 
352 
332 
320 
284 
279 
250 
219 
79 



2/ 

Population 
Estimate for 
1 July 1966 

3,632,140 

22,330 
86,200 

572,270 
31,180 

435,840 

562,330 
25,640 

105,310 
38,780 
62,490 
98,630 
89,220 

264,730 
52,970 
17,270 
43,840 
57,390 
19,940 
20,880 
15,980 
23,260 
49,790 
18,870 

917,000 



Population 
Density 
People/Sq. Mi 

367.8 

33.7 
129.8 
941.2 

55.4 

884.0 

1,159.4 

53.1 
227.9 

84.7 
137.9 
220.1 
209.4 
634.9 
139.3 

46.3 
119.4 
163.0 

60.0 

65.2 

56.2 

83.3 
199.2 

86.1 
11,607.6 



Sources: 1/ Morris L. Radoff, "Maryland Manual 1965-1966," Hall of Records, 
Annapolis, Maryland, 1966. 
2/ Estimated by Maryland Department of Health, Division of 
Biostatistics, by report 19 August 1966. 



36 



No. 6 



POPULATION, STATE OF MARYLAND BY COUNTIES 
AND BALTIMORE CITY - 1966, 1960 





i/ 


2/ 






Estimate 




% Change 




for 


1960 


1966 Estimate 


County 


1 July 1966 


Population 


Over 1960 


Allegany 


89,220 


84,169 


6.0% 


Anne Arundel 


264,730 


206,634 


28.1 


Baltimore City 


917,000 


939,024 


- 2.4 


Baltimore County 


572,270 


492,428 


16.2 


Calvert 


18,870 


15,826 


19.2 


Caroline 


20,880 


19,462 


7.2 


Carroll 


62,490 


52,785 


18.3 


Cecil 


57,390 


48,408 


18.5 


Charles 


38,780 


32,572 


19.0 


Dorchester 


31,180 


29,666 


5.1 


Frederick 


86,200 


71,930 


19.8 


Garrett 


22,330 


20,420 


9.3 


Harford 


98,630 


76,722 


28.5 


Howard 


49,790 


36,152 


37.7 


Kent 


15,980 


15,481 


3.2 


Montgomery 


435,840 


340,928 


27.8 


Prince George's 


562,330 


357,395 


57.3 


Queen Anne ' s 


17,270 


16,569 


4.2 


St. Mary's 


43,840 


38,915 


12.6 


Somerset 


19,940 


19,623 


1.6 


Talbot 


23,260 


21,578 


7.7 


Washington 


105,310 


91,219 


15.4 


Wicomico 


52,970 


49,050 


7.9 


Worcester 


25,640 


23,733 


8.0 


TOTAL MARYLAND 


3,632,140 


3,100,689 


17.1 


TOTAL URBAN 


N.A. 


2,253,832 


N.A. 


TOTAL RURAL 


N.A. 


846,857 


N.A. 



l/ Estimated by Maryland Department of Health, Division of Biostatistics, 

by report 19 August 1966. 
2/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: 1960," Vol. 1, 

Part 22, Maryland, p. 9. 



37 



No, 



POPULATION, STATE OF MARYLAND BY COUNTIES 
AND BALTIMORE CITY, RANK BY 1966 



County 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore County 

Prince George's 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel 

Washington 

Harford 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Howard 

St. Mary's 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Calvert 

Queen Anne ' s 

Kent 

TOTAL MARYLAND 



1/ 


Rank by 


2/ 




Estimate 


1966 




% Change 


for 


Population 


1960 


1966 Estimate 


1 July 1966 


Estimate 


Population 


Over 1960 


917,000 


1 


939,024 


- 2.4% 


572,270 


2 


492,428 


16.2 


562,330 


3 


357,395 


57.3 


435,840 


4 


340,928 


27.8 


264,730 


5 


206,634 


28.1 


105,310 


6 


91,219 


15.4 


98,630 


7 


76,722 


28.5 


89,220 


8 


84,169 


6.0 


86,200 


9 


71,930 


19.8 


62,490 


10 


52,785 


18.3 


57,390 


11 


48,408 


18.5 


52,970 


12 


49,050 


7.9 


49,790 


13 


36,152 


37.7 


43,840 


14 


38,915 


12.6 


38,780 


15 


32,572 


19.0 


31,180 


16 


29,666 


5.1 


25,640 


17 


23,733 


8.0 


23,260 


18 


21,578 


7.7 


22,330 


19 


20,420 


9.3 


19,940 


20 


19,623 


1.6 


20,880 


21 


19,462 


7.2 


18,870 


22 


15,826 


19.2 


17,270 


23 


16,569 


4.2 


15,980 


24 


15,481 


3.2 


,632,140 




3,100,689 


17.1 



Sources: 1/ Estimated by Maryland Department of Health, Division of Biostatistics, 
by report 19 August 1966. 
27 U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: 1960," 
Vol. 1, Part 22, Maryland, p. 9. 



38 



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No. 10 



POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES 
RANKED BY PERCENT OF CHANGE BETWEEN 1965 ESTIMATES AND 1960 FINALS 



State 

Nevada 

Arizona 

California 

Florida 

MARYLAND 

Delaware 

Virginia 

Hawaii 

Colorado 

Alaska 

Connecticut 

New Jersey 

Utah 

Georgia 

New Hampshire 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

New Mexico 

North Carolina 

Tennessee 

New York 

Oregon 

Oklahoma 

South Carolina 

Mississippi 

Alabama 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Washington 

Indiana 

Nebraska 

Montana 

Kentucky 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Massachusetts 

Idaho 



1/ 






Estimate 


2/ 


% Change 


for 


1960 


1965 Estimate 


1 July '65 


Population 
285,278 


Over 1960 


440,000 


54 . 27, 


1,609,000 


1,302,161 


23.5 


18,605,000 


15,717,204 


18.3 


5,805,000 


4,951,560 


17.2 


3,521,000 


3,100,689 


13.5 


505,000 


446,292 


13.1 


4,456,000 


3,966,949 


12.3 


711,000 


632,772 


12.3 


1,969,000 


1,753,947 


12.2 


253,000 


226,167 


11.8 


2,833,000 


2,535,234 


11.7 


6,775,000 


6,066,782 


11.6 


990,000 


890,627 


11.1 


4,358,000 


3,943,116 


10.4 


669,000 


606,921 


10.2 


10,552,000 


9,579,677 


10.1 


1,960,000 


1,786,272 


9.7 


3,534,000 


3,257,022 


8.5 


1,029,000 


951,023 


8.1 


4,914,000 


4,556,155 


7.8 


3,846,000 


3,567,089 


7.8 


18,075,000 


16,782,304 


7.6 


1,900,000 


1,768,687 


7.4 


2,483,000 


2,328,284 


6.6 


2,543,000 


2,382,594 


6.6 


2,322,000 


2,178,141 


6.6 


3,463,000 


3,266,740 


6.0 


10,247,000 


9,706,397 


5.5 


10,646,000 


10,081,158 


5.5 


8,220,000 


7,823,194 


5.0 


4,145,000 


3,951,777 


4.8 


2,990,000 


2,853,214 


4.7 


4,886,000 


4,662,498 


4.7 


1,477,000 


1,411,330 


4.6 


706,000 


674,767 


4.6 


3,179,000 


3,038,156 


4.6 


3,555,000 


3,413,864 


4.1 


4,498,000 


4,319,813 


4.1 


5,349,000 


5,148,578 


3.8 


692,000 


667,191 


3.7 



(continued on following page) 



41 



No. 10 



POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES (cont'd.) 



State 

Rhode Island 

South Dakota 

Wyoming 

North Dakota 

Kansas 

Maine 

Vermont 

Pennsylvania 

Iowa 

West Virginia 

TOTAL 



1/ 








Estimate 


2/ 


% 


Change 


for 


1960 


1965 


Estimate 


1 July '65 


Population 
859,488 


Over 1960 


891,000 




3.6 


703,000 


680,514 




3.3 


340,000 


330,066 




3.0 


652,000 


632,446 




3.0 


2,234,000 


2,178,611 




2.5 


993,000 


969,265 




2.4 


397,000 


389,881 




1.8 


11,522,000 


11,319,366 




1.7 


2,760,000 


2,757,537 




3/ 


1,812,000 


1,860,421 




-2.7 


193,818,000 


178,559,219 4/ 




8.5 



3/ Less than 0.057c. 

4/ Excludes District of Columbia. 



Sources: l/ U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Report, 

"Projections of Population," Series P-25, No. 317, Aug. 27, 1965, 
2/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: I960," 
Vol. 1 "Characteristics of the Population," Table 9, p. 1-16. 



42 



No. 11 



MARYLAND POPULATION GROWTH 1860-1966 



Increase Over Preceding Census 



Census 

1966 (Est) 

1960 

1950 

1940 

1930 

1920 

1910 

1900 

1890 

1880 

1870 

1860 



Population 

3,632,140 

3,100,689 

2,343,001 

1,821,244 

1,631,526 

1,449,661 

1,295,346 

1,188,044 

1,042,390 

934,943 

780,894 

687,049 



Number 
531,451 
757,688 
521,757 
189,718 
181,865 
154,315 
107,302 
145,654 
107,447 
154,049 
93,845 



104,015 



Percent 
17.1 
32.3 
28.6 
11.6 
12.5 
11.9 
9.0 
14.0 
11.5 
19.7 
13.7 
17.8 



% Increase of U.S. Population 
Over Preceding Census-- 
Of The Conterminous 
United States l/ 

8.7 
18.4 
14.5 

7.2 
16.1 
14.9 
21.0 
20.7 
25.5 
26.0 
26.6 
35.6 



l/ All years except 1966 exclude Hawaii and Alaska. 



Source: Estimate for 1 July 1966, Maryland Department of Health, Division of 

Biostatistics, Report 19 August 1966. Other years, U.S. Bureau of the 
Census, "U.S. Census of Population: 1960," Part 22, Maryland, p. 6. 



43 



No. 12 POPULATION, STATE OF MARYLAND BY COUNTIES AND BALTIMORE 

CITY, RANK BY PERCENT OF CHANGE BETWEEN 1966 ESTIMATES AND 1960 FINALS 





1/ 


2/ 






Estimate 




% Change 




for 


1960 


1966 Estimate 


County 


1 July 1966 
562,330 


Population 
357,395 


Over 1960 


Prince George's 


57.3 


Howard 


49,790 


36,152 


37.7 


Harford 


98,630 


76,722 


28.5 


Anne Arundel 


264,730 


206,634 


28.1 


Montgomery 


435,840 


340,928 


27.8 


Frederick 


86,200 


71,930 


19.8 


Calvert 


18,870 


15,826 


19.2 


Charles 


38,780 


32,572 


19.0 


Cecil 


57,390 


48,408 


18.5 


Carroll 


62,490 


52,785 


18.3 


Baltimore County 


572,270 


492,428 


16.2 


Washington 


105,310 


91,219 


15.4 


St. Mary's 


43,480 


38,915 


12.6 


Garrett 


22,330 


20,420 


9.3 


Worcester 


25,640 


23,733 


8.0 


Wicomico 


52,970 


49,050 


7.9 


Talbot 


23,260 


21,578 


7.7 


Caroline 


20,880 


19,462 


7.2 


Allegany 


89,220 


84,169 


6.0 


Dorchester 


31,180 


29,666 


5.1 


Queen Anne' s 


17,270 


16,569 


4.2 


Kent 


15,980 


15,481 


3.2 


Somerset 


19,940 


19,623 


1.6 


Baltimore City 


917,000 


939,024 


- 2.4 


TOTAL MARYLAND 


3,632,140 


3,100,689 


17.1 



Sources: \J Estimated by Maryland Department of Health, Division of Biostatistics, 
by report 19 August 1966. 
2/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: I960," 
Vol. 1, Part 22, Maryland, p. 9. 



44 



No. 13 POPULATION OF SELECTED MARYLAND TOWNS AND CITIES 

1965 and 1950 



Area 1965(1) 

Baltimore City 923,500 

Baltimore Metropolitan Area l/ 1,873,100 

Baltimore Suburban Area 2/ 889,600 

Washington, D. C. 806,500 

Washington Metropolitan Area 3/ 2,392,700 

Maryland Suburban Washington Area 4/ 921,100 

Annapolis 25,500 

Bethesda 68,000 

Cumberland 33,900 

Easton 6,800 

Frederick 24,600 

Hagerstown 37,900 

Hyattsville 17,600 

Rockville 38,400 

Salisbury 17,100 

Westminster 6,400 

\J Includes Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, and Howard Counties 

2/ Includes Baltimore, Anne Arundel, and Howard Counties. 

3/ Includes Washington, D.C., Alexandria and Falls Church Cities in Virginia, 

Arlington and Fairfax Counties in Virginia, Montgomery and Prince George's 

Counties in Maryland. 
4/ Includes Montgomery and Prince George's Counties. 

Sources: (1) Sales Management, Survey of Buying Power, June 10, 1966, Estimates 
for 12/31/65. 
(2) U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: I960," 
Vol. 1, Part 22, Maryland, pp. 12 and 13. 





7o Change 


1960(2) 


1965/1960 


939,024 


- 1.7% 


1,727,023 


8.4 


735,214 


20.9 


763,956 


5.5 


2,001,897 


19.5 


698,323 


31.9 


22,385 


13.9 


56,527 


20.2 


33,415 


1.4 


6,337 


7.3 


21,744 


13.1 


36,660 


3.3 


15,168 


16.0 


26,090 


47.1 


16,302 


4.8 


6,123 


4.5 



45 



No. 14 CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND 

1965 and 1960 



Population (July 1 estimate) 
Civilian Labor Force 
As % of Population 
Workers On Strike 
Unemployment 
Employment 

Self-employed, unpaid family 

and domestic workers 
Agricultural employment 
Manufacturing 
Durable goods 
Non-durable goods 
Non-manufacturing 
Mining 

Contract construction 
Transportation and utilities 
Wholesale trade 
Retail trade 
Finance, insurance and real 

estate 
Services and miscellaneous if 
Federal government 2/ 
State and local government 



1965 


1960 


% Change 


(Annual Average) 


(Annual Average) 


1965/1960 


3,548,300 


3,119,600 


12.1 


1,258,500 


1,115,300 


11.4 


35.4% 


35.7% 


- .3 


1,100 


1,600 


-31.2 


48,700 


62,900 


-22.6 


1,207,500 


1,050,800 


14.9 


120,300 


115,800 


3.9 


29,300 


38,600 


-24.1 


264,000 


259,300 


1.8 


142,700 


144,300 


- 1.1 


121,300 


115,000 


5.5 


793,900 


637,100 


24.6 


2,500 


2,500 





79,800 


61,400 


30.0 


:S 71,300 


72,200 


- 1.2 


47,900 


39,400 


21.9 


186,300 


151,400 


23.1 


54,400 


44,300 


22.8 


1/ 168,500 


123,100 


36.9 


54,200 


47,900 


13.2 


129,000 


94,900 


35.9 



l/ Includes agricultural services, forestry, fishing, laundries and cleaning 

and dyeing plants. 
2/ Excludes Federal Government employment in Montgomery and Prince George's 

Counties . 



Source: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis 
Division, "Labor Force-Employment-Unemployment 1949 to Date," 
various pages. 



46 



No. 15 EMPLOYMENT CATEGORIES AS A PERCENT OF TOTAL EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND 

1965 and 1960 



1965 



1960 



Manufacturing As A Percent of Employment 
Durable Goods 
Non-durable Goods 

Non-manufacturing As A Percent of Employment 
Wholesale & Retail, Trade 
Service & Miscellaneous l/ 
Contract Construction 
Transportation & Utilities 
Government 2/ 

Others (Includes finance, insurance, real 
estate and mining) 

All Other Non-agricultural Employment 

Agriculture 



21.9 


24.6 


11.8 


13.7 


10.0 


10.9 


65.8 


60.7 


19.4 


18.2 


14.0 


11.7 


6.6 


5.8 


5.9 


6.9 


15.2 


13.6 


4.7 


4.5 


9.9 


11.0 


2.4 


3.7 



l/ Includes agricultural services, forestry, fishing, laundries, and 

cleaning and dyeing plants. 
2/ Excludes Federal Government employment of 46,471 in Montgomery and Prince 

George's Counties. 



Source: Calculations based on Table 14, p. 46. 



47 



No. 16 



GOVERNMENT PURCHASES 



PERSONAL CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURES 



:\ 



PRIVATE INVESTMENT 



Gross National 
Product 

The Market Value of All 
Goods and Services Produced 



Flow of 
Income and 
Expenditures 
in the 
United States 



CAPITAL 



CONSUMPTION 



CORPORATE 



Net National 
Product 



National 
Income 



SAVINGS 



PERSONAL 



INDIRECT BUSINESS TAXES 



> 



CORPORATE PROFIT TAXES 



Personal 
Income 



3^ 



Disposable 

Persona I 
Income 



SAVINGS 



3_J 



PERSONAL CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURES 



SOCIAL INSURANCE 



PERSONAL TAXES 



INTERES T AND 



> 

o 



TRANSFER PAYMENTS 



GOVERNMENT PURCHASES 



SOURCE: Based on the Twentieth Century Fund's Report on America's 
Needs and Resources. 



48 



No. 17 CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET l/ 

BALTIMORE AND SELECTED U.S. CITIES, AUTUMN, 1960 
AND ESTIMATED 1965 REQUIREMENT (BASED ON SELECTED CITIES' CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES) 



% Increase 

















In 


Consumer 


% Difference 






Total Budg 


et 


Total Budget 




Price Index 


Compared With 


City 




1965 




1960 






1965/1960 
7.4 


Baltimore 2/ 


Baltimore 


$6,141 




$5,718 




— — 


Boston 




7,056 




6,317 








11.7 


14.8 


Chicago 




6,961 




6,567 








6.0 


13.3 


Cincinnati 




6,405 




6,100 








5.0 


4.2 


Cleveland 




6,558 




6,199 








5.8 


6.7 


Detroit 




6,436 




6,072 








6.0 


4.8 


New York 




6,584 




5,970 








10.3 


7.2 


Philadelphia 




6,440 




5,898 








9.2 


4.8 


Pittsburgh 




6,713 




6,199 








8.3 


9.3 


Washington 




6,669 




6,147 








8.5 


8.5 


1/ Estimated 1 


3Udg< 


2t necessary 


to 


maintain a 


family 


of 


four persons at a level 


of "modest 


but 


adequate" 1 


iving, as developed 


by the U.S. Bureau of Labor 


Statistics 


• 


















2/ Represents 


the 


percentage 


difi 


lerence in family budget required 


for comparable 



living in cities other than Baltimore. 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 

1966," (87th edition), Tables 500 and 503, pp. 357 and 359 respectively. 



49 



No. 18 



PERSONAL INCOME BY MAJOR SOURCE 

MARYLAND, 1964 AND 1960 

(In Millions of Dollars) 







As % of 




As % of 






1/ 


Personal 


2/ 


Personal 


7o Change 




1965 
10,604 


Income 
100.0 


1960 
7,453 


Income 
100.0 


1965/1960 


Personal Income, Total 


42.2 


Wages and Salaries 


7,762 


73.2 


5,405 


72.5 


43.6 


Farms 


24 


.2 


33 


0.4 


-27.3 


Mining 


18 


.2 


13 


0.2 


38.4 


Contract Construction 


515 


4.9 


338 


4.5 


52.3 


Manufacturing 


1,736 


16.4 


1,353 


18.2 


28.3 


Wholesale & Retail Trade 


1,194 


11.3 


912 


12.2 


30.9 


Finance, Insurance & Real 












Estate 


342 


3.2 


238 


3.2 


43.6 


Transportation 


351 


3.3 


285 


3.8 


23.1 


Communications & Public 












Utilities 


220 


2.1 


156 


2.1 


41.0 


Services 


926 


8.7 


583 


7.8 


58.8 


Federal Govt. , Civilian 


1,325 


12.5 


767 


10.3 


72.7 


Federal Govt. , Military 


344 


3.2 


250 


3.4 


37.6 


State & Local Govt. 


754 


7.1 


461 


6.2 


63.5 


Other Industries 


13 


.1 


16 


0.2 


-18.8 


Other Labor Income 


334 


3.2 


181 


2.4 


84.5 


Proprietors' Income 


826 


7.8 


630 


8.5 


31.1 


Farm 


103 


1.0 


78 


1.1 


32.0 


Non-farm 


722 


6.8 


552 


7.4 


30.7 


Property Income 


1,329 


12.5 


931 


12.5 


42.7 


Transfer Payments 


652 


6.1 


510 


6.8 


27.8 



Less: Personal Contributions 
for Social Insurance 



299 



2.8 



204 



2.7 



46.5 



Sources: 1/ U.S. Department of Commerce, "Survey of Current Business," 
August 1966, Vol. 46, No. 8, p. 14. 
2/ U.S. Department of Commerce, "Survey of Current Business," 
August 1963, Vol. 43, No. 8, p. 10. 



50 



No. 19 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
1965 and 1960 



State & Region 

United States 

Mideast 
Maryland 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 

Southeast 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 
Mississippi 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 



Total Personal Income (millions of dollars) 
1965 1960 



32,147 


398,725 


10,604 


7,289 


59,350 


46,281 


21,950 


16,528 


31,816 


25,395 


1,706 


1,238 


10,691 


7,339 


3,679 


2,957 


10,070 


7,142 


4,708 


3,298 


9,478 


6,489 


14,041 


9,746 


3,712 


2,632 


6,489 


4,792 


7,749 


5,521 


6,660 


4,876 



% Change 
1965/1960 

33.5 



45.5 
28.2 
32.8 
25.3 
37.8 



45.7 
24.4 
41.0 
42.8 
46.1 
44.1 
41.0 
35.4 
40.4 
36.6 



Maryland As Percent of U.S, 



2.0% 



1.83% 



Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, 

"Survey of Current Business," August 1966, Vol. 46, No. 8, p, 



12. 



Note: State Personal Income is income received by State residents from all 

sources during any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received 
by federal military and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad, 



51 



No. 20 



PER CAPITA PERSONAL INCOME 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
1965 and 1960 



Per Capita Personal Income (dollars) 
State & Region 1965 1960 



2,746 



United States 

Mideast 
Maryland 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 

Southeast 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 
Mississippi 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 



Maryland As Percent of U.S. 109.3% 



2,215 



3,001 


2,343 


3,278 


2,746 


3,237 


2,708 


2,747 


2,242 


3,392 


2,757 


2,419 


1,841 


2,027 


1,594 


2,041 


1,561 


1,846 


1,377 


2,159 


1,639 


2,423 


1,950 


1,608 


1,205 


2,045 


1,574 


2,013 


1,543 


1,910 


1,488 



% Change 
1965/1960 

24.0 



28.1 
19.4 
19.5 
22.5 
23.0 



31.4 
27.2 
30.7 
34.1 
31.7 
24.3 
33.4 
29.9 
30.5 
28.4 



Rank i 
Nation 
Based on 
Income 



11 

5 

7 

18 

2 



30 
45 
44 
49 
41 
29 
50 
43 
46 
47 



105.8% 



Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, 

"Survey of Current Business," August 1966, Vol. 46, No. 8, p. 13, 



Note: State Personal Income is income received by State residents from all 

sources during any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received 
by federal military and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad. 



52 



So. 21 



PER HOUSEHOLD DISPOSABLE INCOME l/ 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES, 1965 



Income Breakdown of Households 





Per Household 










$10,000 


State 


Disposable Income 


$0-2499 


$2500-3999 


$4000-6999 


$7000-9999 


& Over 


Mideast 














Maryland 


9,384 


12.6 


12.1 


29.0 


18.6 


27.7 


New York 


9,117 


15.4 


11.6 


31.8 


13.9 


27.3 


New Jersey 


9,355 


12.3 


11.4 


31.3 


18.1 


26.9 


Pennsylvania 


8,024 


18.0 


15.5 


32.8 


14.8 


18.9 


Delaware 


10,521 


14.4 


13.6 


31.2 


16.6 


24.2 


Southeast 














Virginia 


7,658 


26.8 


16.2 


27.8 


9.6 


19.6 


West Virginia 


6,663 


26.6 


16.8 


30.0 


13.4 


13.2 


North Carolina 


6,848 


27.0 


19.6 


29.4 


11-2 


12.8 


South Carolina 


6,354 


29.5 


19.5 


28.1 


12.2 


10.7 


Georgia 


6,886 


23.3 


21.9 


27.5 


12.6 


14.7 


Florida 


6,611 


29.8 


23.4 


23.9 


10.0 


12.9 


Mississippi 


5,536 


37.0 


20.7 


24.0 


9.5 


8.8 


Kentucky 


6,214 


31.5 


18.2 


27.7 


11.5 


11.1 


Tennessee 


6,283 


31.2 


18.6 


27.1 


11.9 


11.2 


Alabama 


6,107 


30.3 


20.2 


26.1 


11.3 


12.1 


U.S. Totals 


7,989 


20.1 


15.0 


30.0 


14.6 


20.3 



l/ Household income after all federal, state and local taxes have been deducted. 
Source: Sales Management, "Survey of Buying Power," June 10, 1966, various pages. 



53 



No. 22 PER HOUSEHOLD DISPOSABLE INCOME 

MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
WHOSE HIGHEST INCOME 1/ HOUSEHOLDS OUT NUMBER THE LOWEST INCOME 2/ GROUP 

1965 





Number of 


















Households 




Household 


Income 


Highest 


Income Households 


State 


(000) 
985.3 


Und 


er $2,500 
124.1 


Ovi 


er $10,000 
272.9 


As 


! % 


of Lowest 


Maryland 






220 


Delaware 


146.3 




21.1 




35.4 






168 


New Jersey 


2,007.7 




246.9 




540.1 






219 


New York 


5,602.6 




862.8 




1,529.5 






177 


Pennsylvania 


3,467.6 




624.2 




655.4 






104 



United States 



57,820.5 



11,621.9 



11,737.6 



101 



1/ Over $10,000. 
2/ Under $2,500. 



Source: Sales Management, June 10, 1966, "SURVEY OF BUYING POWER." 



54 



No. 23 ESTIMATED DISPOSABLE INCOME, PER CAPITA AND PER HOUSEHOLD 

BY COUNTIES, MARYLAND 
RANKED BY PER CAPITA INCOME, 1965 





Per 




Per 






Capita 




Household 




County 


Income 


Rank 


Income 


Rank 


Montgomery 


3,665 


1 


13,508 


1 


Prince George's 


2,664 


2 


10,006 


2 


Baltimore 1/ 


2,623 


3 


9,148 


5 


Howard 


2,478 


4 


9,419 


4 


Anne Arundel 


2,404 


5 


9,683 


3 


Talbot 


2,403 


6 


7,514 


13 


Harford 


2,298 


7 


8,644 


6 


Washington 


2,244 


8 


7,574 


11 


Carroll 


2,143 


9 


7,985 


8 


Wicomico 


2,139 


10 


7,160 


14 


Frederick 


2,136 


11 


7,593 


10 


Allegany 


2,131 


12 


6,912 


15 


Cecil 


2,070 


13 


8,280 


7 


Kent 


1,923 


14 


6,398 


17 


Queen Anne's 


1,833 


15 


6,190 


18 


Dorchester 


1,815 


16 


5,986 


19 


Charles 


1,815 


17 


7,661 


9 


Caroline 


1,784 


18 


5,720 


21 


Worcester 


1,756 


19 


5,748 


20 


St. Mary's 


1,730 


20 


7,560 


12 


Calvert 


1,664 


21 


6,802 


16 


Somerset 


1,634 


22 


5,475 


22 


Garrett 


1,449 


23 


5,361 


23 


Baltimore City 


2,467 


-- 


8,374 


__ 


Baltimore Metro. Area 


2,574 


— 


9,184 


— 


State Average 


2,605 


-- 


9,384 


— 


U.S. Average 


2,367 


— 


7,989 


-- 



1/ Baltimore County figure includes Baltimore City and Baltimore County. 

Source: Sales Management, "Survey of Buying Power," June 10, 1966, various pages 

Note: Net disposable income as estimated by Sales Management is net of taxes 
and, therefore, differs from per capita personal income figures 
estimated by the U.S. Department of Commerce. 



55 



No. 24 



NUMBER OF MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH 
1963 and 1958 



Number of Establishments 



Mideast 

New Jersey 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 
New York 

Southeast 
Georgia 

North Carolina 
Tennessee 
South Carolina 
Alabama 
Virginia 
Kentucky 
West Virginia 

U.S. Totals 



1963 1/ 



14,906 

3,451 

19,089 

548 

46,163 

6,237 
7,760 
4,718 
3,028 
4,100 
4,493 
2,886 
1,817 

307,176 



1958 2/ 



14,009 

3,435 

19,037 

547 

48,523 



5,796 
7,289 
4,450 
2,888 
3,927 
4,414 
2,850 
1,899 

299,036 



% Change 
1963/1958 



6.4% 
0.4 
0.3 
0.2 
-4.9 



7.6 
6.5 
6.0 
4.8 
4.4 
1.8 
1.2 
-4.3 

5.8 



Sources: 1/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufacturers: 1963," 
Preliminary Report, MC 63(P)-9, General Statistics for States, 
various pages. 
2/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufacturers: 1958," 
Vol. Ill, Area Statistics, various pages. 



56 



No. 25 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ENGAGED IN MANUFACTURING 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH IN TOTAL EMPLOYEES 

1963 and 1958 



Mideast 
Delaware 
Maryland 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
New York 

Southeast 
Virginia 
North Carolina 
Tennessee 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Alabama 
Kentucky 
West Virginia 

U.S. Totals 



Product: 


Lon Workers 


All Workers 


% 


Growth 










1963/1958 


1963 1/ 


1958 2/ 


1963 1/ 


1958 2/ 


All 


Workers 


31,161 


31,015 


59,803 


58,265 




2.67, 


188,867 


188,721 


263,709 


257,271 




2.5 


576,142 


584,633 


829,176 


812,537 




2.0 


1,029,595 


1,061,034 


1,395,473 


1,421,158 




-1.8 


1,255,014 


1,349,679 


1,849,991 


1,968,172 




-6.0 


239,377 


213,876 


302,910 


265,629 




14.0 


444,934 


416,652 


550,794 


490,147 




12.4 


268,972 


240,534 


340,670 


303,929 




12.1 


220,760 


203,665 


261,359 


236,548 




10.5 


290,890 


270,051 


355,361 


324,340 




9.6 


197,800 


188,554 


244,241 


231,986 




5.3 


140,610 


133,410 


181,600 


173,041 




4.9 


90,560 


95,001 


118,860 


121,475 




-2.2 


12,263,000 


11,666,000 


16,973,000 


16,035,000 







Sources: 1/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufactures: 1963," 
"General Statistics for States," MC 63(P)-9, various pages. 
2/ U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufactures: 1958," 
Vol. Ill "Area Statistics," various pages. 



57 



No. 26 



VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURING 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH 
1963 and 1958 





Value 


Added 








(dollars 


in thousands) 














% of Change 




1963 






1958 


1963/1958 


Mideast 












Delaware 


$ 666,245 




$ 


419,831 


58.7% 


New Jersey 


9,980,065 






7,499,367 


33.1 


Maryland 


2,978,013 






2,379,414 


25.2 


New York 


19,510,191 






15,891,767 


22.8 


Pennsylvania 


13,968,675 






11,422,611 


22.3 


Southeast 












South Carolina 


2,117,387 






1,360,135 


55.7 


Georgia 


3,238,776 






2,102,332 


54.1 


Tennessee 


3,343,790 






2,207,073 


51.5 


North Carolina 


4,617,912 






3,083,448 


49.8 


West Virginia 


1,834,458 






1,263,842 


45.1 


Virginia 


3,064,019 






2,122,652 


44.3 


Kentucky 


2,460,058 






1,769,269 


39.0 


Alabama 


2,342,124 






1,770,510 


32.3 


U.S. Totals 


$190,555,000 




$141,444,000 


34.7 


Source: U.S. Bureau 


of the Census, 


"U. 


, S. Census of Manufactures 


: 1963," 



"General Statistics for States," MC 63(P)-9, various pages 



58 



No. 27 



MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH 
1963 and 1958 



Mideast 



Virginia 

South Carolina 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Kentucky 

Alabama 

West Virginia 

U.S. Totals 



Payrolls 
(dollars in thousands) 



1963 



New Jersey 
Delaware 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 
New York 


5,111,937 

437,800 

1,550,013 

8,010,193 

11,116,459 


Southeast 





1,430,344 
1,037,493 
2,087,582 
1,505,277 
1,540,172 

963,329 
1,157,450 

718,980 

99,598,000 



1958 



4,038,500 
348,687 
1,255,242 
6,759,014 
9,588,028 



981,704 



732,149 

,488 

j.,075,j.. 

1,105,511 
7on r\. 



I JZ, J 
1,488,892 
1,075,120 



720,045 



?18,213 

- a -i i r A 



587,164 



78,326,000 



% of Change 
1958/1963 



26.6% 

25.6 

23.5 

18.5 

15.9 



45.7 
41.7 
40.2 
40.0 
39.3 
33.8 
26.1 
22.4 

27.2 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufactures: 1963," 
"General Statistics for States," MC 63(P)-9, various pages. 



59 



No. 28 MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND 

RANK BY PERCENTAGE OF CHANGE 
1965 and 1960, ANNUAL AVERAGES 



SIC Industry 

30 Rubber & Misc. Plastic Products 

27 Printing & Publishing 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
26 Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 

32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 
38 Other Durable Goods 

23 Apparel & Related Products 

28 Chemicals & Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 
25 Furniture & Fixtures 

33 Primary Metals Industries 
20 Food & Kindred Products 
22 Textile Mill Products 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

24 Lumber & Wood Products 

31 Leather & Leather Products 

37 Transportation Equipment 
99 Other non-durable goods 

Durable Goods Total 
Non-Durable Goods Total 
All Manufacturing Total 

Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," "Report on 
Employment," for 1965 and 1960. 







°/o Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


11,100 


9,000 


23.3% 


16,600 


13,700 


21.2 


14,100 


11,700 


20.5 


9,200 


8,400 


9.5 


10,400 


9,600 


8.3 


6,500 


6,000 


8.3 


23,900 


22,900 


4.4 


16,900 


16,300 


3.7 


14,900 


14,400 


3.5 


5,400 


5,300 


1.9 


42,600 


42,200 


0.9 


37,700 


38,100 


- 1.0 


2,700 


2,800 


- 3.6 


22,800 


24,200 


- 5.8 


4,300 


5,000 


-14.0 


2,200 


2,600 


-15.4 


21,700 


25,900 


-16.2 


1,000 


1,200 


-16.7 


142,700 


144,300 


- 1.1 


121,300 


115,000 


5.5 


264,000 


259,300 


1.8 



60 



No. 29 



MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND 
RATE OF INDUSTRY GROWTH 
1965/1960 and 1960/1950 
(RANK BY 1965-1960 GROWTH RATE) 



SIC 

30 

27 
35 
26 
32 
38 
23 
28 
36 
25 
33 
20 
22 
34 
24 
31 
37 
99 



SIC 

36 

26 
27 
32 
33 
35 
25 
38 
20 
28 
37 
23 
31 
34 
24 
22 
99 
30 



Industry 

Rubber & Misc. Plastic Products 
Printing & Publishing 
Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 
Stone, Clay & Glass Products 
Other Durable Goods 
Apparel & Related Products 
Chemicals & Related Products 
Electrical Machinery 
Furniture & Fixtures 
Primary Metals Industry 
Food & Kindred Products 
Textile Mill Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Lumber and Wood Products 
Leather & Leather Products 
Transportation Equipment 
Other non-durable goods 



Industry 

Electrical Machinery 
Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 
Printing & Publishing 
Stone, Clay & Glass Products 
Primary Metals Industry 
Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
Furniture & Fixtures 
Other Durable Goods 
Food & Kindred Products 
Chemicals & Related Products 
Transportation Equipment 
Apparel & Related Products 
Leather & Leather Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Lumber & Wood Products 
Textile Mill Products 
Other non-durable goods 
Rubber & Misc. Plastic Products 



% Change 
1965/1960 

23.3% 

21.2 

20.5 

9.5 

8.3 

8.3 

4.4 

3.7 

3.5 

1.9 

0.9 

- 1.0 

- 3.6 

- 5.8 
-14.0 
-15.4 
-16.2 
-16.7 

% Change 
1960/1950 

118.2% 
64.7 
31.7 
24.7 
23.4 
23.2 
15.2 
0.0 

- 1.8 

- 3.0 

- 7.2 
-10.2 
-18.7 
-18.7 
-19.4 
-41.7 
-87.8 

n/a 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," "Report on 
Employment," for 1965 and 1960. 



61 



No. 30 MANUFACTURING AND NON -MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS IN MARYLAND 

1965 AND 1960 (MILLIONS OF DOLLARS) 



Manufacturing 
Non-manufacturing 

Government 

Federal, Civilian 3/ 
Federal, Military 
State & Local 

Wholesale & Retail Trade 

Services 

Contract Construction 

Transportation 

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate 

Communications & Public Utilities 

Mining 

TOTAL 



1/ 


2/ 


% Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


1,736 


1,353 


28.3 


5,989 


4,002 


49.7 


2,423 


1,477 


64.0 


1,325 


767 


72.7 


344 


250 


37.6 


754 


461 


63.5 


1,194 


912 


30.9 


926 


583 


58.8 


515 


338 


52.3 


351 


285 


23.1 


342 


238 


43.6 


220 


156 


41.0 


18 


13 


38.4 



7,725 



5,355 



44.3 



3/ Including Montgomery and Prince George's counties. 



Sources: 1/ U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, 

"Survey of Current Business," August 1966, Vol. 46, No. 8, p. 14. 
2/ U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, 

"Survey of Current Business," August 1963, Vol. 43, No. 8, p. 10. 



62 



No. 31 



MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS IN MARYLAND, 1965 AND 1960 
RANK BY DOLLAR VALUE IN 1965 



SIC Industry 

33 Primary Metal Industries 
20 Food & Kindred Products 
37 Transportation Equipment 
28 Chemicals & Products 

27 Printing & Publishing 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

23 Apparel & Related Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 

30 Rubber Products 

26 Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 

25 Furniture & Fixtures 

24 Lumber & Wood Products 
22 Textile Mill Products 

All Other Durable Goods 
All Other Non-durable Goods 
Durable Goods Total 
Non-durable Goods Total 
All Manufacturing Total 







% Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


$326,048,516 


$263,423,828 


23.7 


187,859,425 


158,439,908 


18.5 


162,810,001 


183,458,657 


-11.3 


110,205,043 


70,382,767 


56.5 


100,663,201 


71,770,444 


40.2 


98,479,608 


65,327,911 


50.7 


96,590,643 


76,525,726 


26.2 


87,420,233 


88,308,373 


- 1.1 


87,238,763 


74,632,830 


16.8 


64,616,102 


49,472,063 


30.6 


62,768,381 


43,393,625 


44.6 


55,124,217 


42,915,976 


28.4 


27,105,188 


21,407,721 


26.6 


17,034,738 


16,419,672 


3.7 


11,979,364 


25,557,676 


-53.2 


148,022,757 


88,576,862 


67.1 


15,961,621 


15,784,601 


1.1 


1,018,775,906 


851,027,917 


11.9 


641,151,895 


504,770,723 


27.0 


1,659,927,801 


1,355,798,640 


12.2 



Source: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research & Analysis Division, 
"Employment & Payrolls Covered by the Unemployment Insurance Law," for 
1965 and 1960. 



63 



No. 32 



AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
IN MARYLAND, 1965, 1960 



SIC Industry 

33 Primary Metal Industries 

37 Transportation Equipment 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

27 Printing & Publishing 

32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 

28 Chemicals & Related Products 

30 Rubber Products 

26 Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 

20 Food & Kindred Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 

23 Apparel & Related Products 
25 Furniture & Fixtures 

24 Lumber & Wood Products 

31 Leather & Leather Products 
99 Other non-durable goods 

38 Other durable goods 

Durable Goods Average 
Non-Durable Goods Average 
All Manufacturing Average 







% Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


3.28 


2.83 


15.9% 


3.25 


2.73 


19.0 


2.82 


2.51 


12.4 


2.83 


2.45 


15.5 


2.85 


2.42 


17.8 


2.78 


2.36 


17.8 


2.55 


2.31 


10.4 


2.64 


2.27 


16.3 


n/a 


2.05 


-- 


2.35 


2.02 


16.3 


2.14 


1.88 


13.8 


1.82 


1.67 


9.0 


1.84 


1.58 


16.5 


n/a 


1.56 


— 


N/A 


1.46 


-- 


1.71 


1.41 


21.3 


n/a 


2.91 


— 


n/a 


1.99 


-- 


2.92 


2.53 


15.4 


2.25 


1.94 


16.0 


2.62 


2.26 


15.9 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non -agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," "Report on 
Hours & Earnings," for 1965 and 1960. 



64 



No. 33 AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

IN MARYLAND, 1965, 1960 



SIC Industry 

33 Primary Metals Industry 

37 Transportation Equipment 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 
32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

27 Printing & Publishing 

28 Chemicals & Related Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 
26 Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 

30 Rubber Products 
20 Food & Kindred Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 
25 Furniture & Fixtures 
24 Lumber & Wood Products 

23 Apparel & Related Products 

31 Leather & Leather Products 
99 Other non-durable goods 

38 Other durable goods 

Durable Goods Average 
Non-Durable Goods Average 
All Manufacturing Average 

Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," "Report on 
Hours & Earnings," for 1965 and 1960. 







% Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


136.45 


111.79 


22.1% 


137.48 


108.38 


26.8 


117.31 


102.91 


14.0 


119.54 


100.30 


19.2 


119.43 


99.47 


20.0 


115.71 


97.04 


19.2 


107.45 


92.84 


15.7 


105.57 


92.40 


14.3 


100.82 


88.68 


13.7 


n/a 


84.87 


— 


88.38 


75.95 


16.4 


75.35 


67.80 


11.1 


N/A 


64.27 


— 


n/a 


58.69 


— 


68.26 


57.35 


19.0 


67.55 


52.88 


27.7 


n/a 


119.02 


— 


n/a 


80.60 


— 


122.06 


101.96 


19.7 


90.90 


77.21 


17.7 


107.94 


90.63 


19.1 



65 



No. 34 



VALUE ADDED BY PRINCIPAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND 1963 and 1958 
RANK BY DOLLAR VOLUME IN 1963 



SIC 

33 
37 
20 
36 
28 
34 
23 
27 
35 
32 
26 
30 
25 
24 
29 
22 
31 
38 



Industry 

Primary Metal Products 
Transportation Equipment 
Food & Kindred Products 
Electrical Machinery 
Chemicals & Related Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Apparel & Related Products 
Printing & Publishing 
Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
Stone, Clay & Glass Products 
Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 
Rubber Products 
Furniture & Fixtures 
Lumber & Wood Products 
Petroleum & Coal Products 
Textile Mill Products 
Leather & Leather Products 
Scientific Instruments 



State Totals - All Industries 



1963 


1958 


(000's) 


(000' s) 


$ 509,289 


$ 430,062 


403,388 


394,831 


419,836 


326,302 


312,625 


185,681 


298,182 


192,548 


138,699 


135,399 


153,482 


119,006 


146,070 


99,138 


142,105 


105,275 


127,355 


94,268 


101,623 


74,850 


87,873 


74,000 


32,130 


29,825 


28,673 


23,630 


19,201 


18,818 


17,577 


18,929 


(D) 


10,849 


17,835 


(D) 


$3,001,468 


$2,394,414 



% Change 
1963/1958 

18.4 

2.2 
28.7 
68.4 
54.9 

2.4 
29.0 
47.3 
35.0 
35.1 
35.8 
18.7 

7.7 
21.3 

2.0 
-7.2 
(D) 
(D) 

25.4 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufacturers: 
Statistics for States," MC 63(P) -9, p. 26. 



1963," "General 



66 



No. 35 



VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND 
RANK BY PERCENT CHANGE 
1963 to 1958 



SIC 



Industry 



% Change 
1963/195* 



36 

28 
27 
26 
35 
32 
23 
24 
20 
33 
30 
29 
34 
25 
31 
37 
22 
381 



Electrical machinery 
Chemicals & Related Products 
Printing & Publishing 
Pulp, Paper & Paper Products 
Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
Stone, Clay & Glass Products 
Apparel & Related Products 
Lumber & Wood Products 
Food & Kindred Products 
Primary Metals Products 
Rubber Products 
Petroleum & Coal Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Furniture & Fixtures 
Leather & Leather Products 
Transportation Equipment 
Textile Mill Products 
Scientific Instruments 



58.9% 
49.1 
46.1 
35.4 
33.5 
32.3 
28.7 
25.3 
23.2 
19.9 
18.4 
18.3 
15.6 
9.9 
9.2 
1.9 

■ 3.0 

■ 8.0 



State Total - All Industries 



25.2 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Manufactures 
Statistics for States," MC 63(P)-9, p. 26. 



1963 



'General 



67 



No. 36 NON -MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND 

ANNUAL AVERAGES, 1965 and 1960 



7o Change 

Non-agricultural 1965 1960 1965/1960 

Non -manufacturing (000' s) (000* s) 

Wholesale & Retail Trade 234.2 190.7 22.8% 

Government l/ 183.2 142.8 28.3 

Service & Miscellaneous 2/ 168.5 123.2 36.8 

Contract Construction 79.8 61.4 30.0 

Finance, Insurance & Real Estate 54.4 44.3 22.8 

Transportation, Excluding Railroad 34.6 33.3 3.9 



Public Utilities & Communications 24.3 22.4 8.5 

Railroad Transportation 12.4 16.5 -24.8 

Mining 2.5 2.5 0.0 



183.2 


142.8 


168.5 


123.2 


79.8 


61.4 


54.4 


44.3 


34.6 


33.3 


24.3 


22.4 


12.4 


16.5 


2.5 


2.5 



914.2 


752.9 


21.4 


29.3 


38.6 


-24.1 


943.5 


791.5 


19.2 



Non-agricultural Non-manufacturing 

Employment 793.9 637.1 24.6 

All Other Non-agricultural Non- 
manufacturing Employment 3/ 120.3 115.8 3.9 

Total Non-agricultural Non- 
manufacturing Employment 

Agricultural Employment 

Total Non-manufacturing Employment 

l/ Excludes Federal Government employment of 46,471 in Montgomery and Prince George' 

Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan Area statistics 

by the U. S. Bureau of the Census. 
l] Includes agricultural services, forestry, fishing, laundries, cleaning 

and dyeing plants, etc. 
3/ Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers and domestics in private 

households. 

Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," and "Labor 
Force, Employment & Unemployment, 1949 thru 1965." 



68 



No. 37 NON -MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT 

INCLUDING AGRICULTURAL AND SELF-EMPLOYED, 1965 and 1960 
RANK BY PERCENT OF TOTAL IN 1965 BY CATEGORY 



Industry 1965 1960 

Wholesale & Retail Trade 

Government 1/ 

Service & Miscellaneous 2/ 

Contract Construction 

Finance, Insurance & Real Estate 

Transportation, Excluding Railroad 

Public Utilities & Communications 

Railroad Transportation 

Mining 

Total Non-agricultural Non-manufacturing 

All Other Non-agricultural Non-manufacturing 3/ 

Agricultural Employment 

Total Non-manufacturing Employment 100.0% 100.0% 

\J Excludes Federal Government employment of 46,471 in Montgomery and Prince George's 

Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan Area statistics 

by the U. S. Bureau of the Census. 
2/ Includes agricultural services, forestry, fishing, laundries, cleaning 

and dyeing plants, etc. 
3/ Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers and domestics in private 

households. 

Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment, Manufacturing Hours & Earnings, 1957 SIC," and "Labor 
Force, Employment & Unemployment, 1949 thru 1965." 



24.8% 


24.1% 


19.4 


18.0 


17.8 


15.6 


8.5 


7.8 


5.7 


5.6 


3.7 


4.2 


2.6 


2.8 


1.3 


2.1 


0.3 


0.3 


(84.1) 


(80.5) 


12.8 


14.6 


3.1 


4.9 



69 



No. 38 NON -MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND 

RANK BY PERCENT CHANGE 1965/1960 



7 Change 

Industry 1965/1960 

Service and Miscellaneous 2/ 36.8% 

Contract Construction 30.0 

Government 1/ 28.3 

Finance, Insurance & Real Estate 22.8 

Wholesale & Retail Trade 22.8 

Public Utilities & Communications 8.5 

Transportation, Excluding Railroad 3.9 

Mining 0.0 

Railroad Transportation -24.8 

All Other Non-manufacturing Non-agricultural Employment 3.9 

Agricultural Employment -24.1 

\J Excludes Federal Government employment of 46,471 in Montgomery and Prince George's 

Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan area statistics 

by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. 
2/ Includes agricultural services, forestry, fishing, laundries, cleaning 

and dyeing plants, etc. 

3/ Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers and domestics in private 

households . 



Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 
Employment," and "Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment, 1949 thru 
1965." 



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71 



No. 40 



MARYLAND RETAIL TRADE 
BY COUNTY, 1963 



County 

Maryland Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Baltimore County 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Source: 







Payroll 


Paid 


Establishments 


Sales 


Entire Year 


Employees 


(number) 


($1,000) 

4,237,061 


($1,000) 
503,698 


(number) 


23,901 


157,289 


869 


114,241 


12,537 


4,132 


1,398 


267,644 


32,096 


10,001 


8,661 


1,316,945 


176,280 


57,193 


2,800 


577,992 


67,566 


22,562 


136 


14,425 


1,392 


470 


243 


19,822 


1,736 


576 


588 


64,482 


6,317 


1,989 


399 


44,622 


4,238 


1,390 


320 


46,859 


5,571 


1,887 


268 


30,501 


3,087 


908 


673 


92,751 


9,911 


3,169 


209 


20,736 


1,987 


672 


591 


87,510 


8,945 


2,669 


272 


38,584 


4,005 


1,208 


202 


22,521 


2,060 


648 


1,631 


583,464 


67,610 


17,880 


1,805 


512,221 


58,694 


17,545 


170 


15,199 


1,331 


431 


335 


37,956 


3,788 


1,171 


256 


19,862 


1,322 


479 


280 


53,300 


4,948 


1,360 


893 


129,659 


15,029 


4,756 


493 


83,454 


9,130 


2,769 


409 


42,311 


4,118 


1,424 


; Census, "U.S. 


Census of Bus 


iness: 1963," 


Vol. 2 "Retail 



Trade-Area Statistics," Table 3, p. 22-8. 



72 



No. 41 



MARYLAND WHOLESALE TRADE 
BY COUNTY, 1963 



County 

Maryland Total 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Baltimore County 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne' s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 







Payroll 


Paid 


Establishments 


Sales 


Entire Year 


Employees 


(number) 


($1,000) 
4,473,736 


($1,000) 
248,208 


(number) 


3,658 


44,104 


117 


48,705 


3,312 


717 


89 


64,663 


5,588 


1,014 


1,906 


2,682,029 


155,692 


26,629 


271 


361,612 


22,552 


3,430 


7 


2,901 


188 


70 


29 


23,774 


913 


232 


44 


19,701 


1,276 


294 


30 


16,536 


986 


215 


29 


33,162 


1,526 


289 


43 


23,929 


977 


364 


70 


40,579 


3,455 


730 


20 


6,636 


371 


106 


46 


33,755 


1,762 


392 


23 


21,925 


1,790 


328 


24 


9,910 


643 


187 


254 


433,713 


13,072 


2,025 


231 


387,962 


16,089 


2,891 


23 


12,799 


688 


237 


18 


11,318 


828 


170 


31 


7,789 


702 


358 


43 


19,889 


1,242 


307 


142 


97,179 


7,444 


1,539 


127 


98,326 


6,118 


1,327 


41 


14,944 


994 


253 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Business: 1963," Vol. 
"Wholesale Trade-Area Statistics," Table 4, p. 22-8. 



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78 



No. 43 



MARYLAND FARM LAND, ACREAGE, AND VALUE 
1964 and 1959 



Item 

Approximate Total Land of State 

of Maryland 
Land In Farms 

Proportion Of Land In Farms 

Farms 

Average Size Per Farm 

Value Of Land & Buildings: 
Average Per Farm 
Average Per Acre 

Commercial Farms 
As % Of All Farms 

Cropland Harvested 

As % Of All Farm Land 

Land Pastured (Including 
Woodland) 
As % Of All Farm Land 

Cropland Not Harvested Or 
Pastured 
As % Of All Farm Land 

Woodland Not Pastured 
As % Of All Farm Land 



Units 


1964 


1959 


% Change 
1964/1959 


Acres 


6,319,360 


6,319,360 


0.0% 


Acres 


3,180,696 


3,456,769 


- 8.0 


Percent 


50.4% 


54.7% 




Number 


20,760 


25,122 


-17.4 


Acres 


153.2 


137.6 


11.3 


Dollars 
Dollars 


$66,975 
$435.02 


$36,461 
$276.22 


83.6 
57.4 


Number 
Percent 


14,467 
69.7% 


15,979 
63.6% 


- 9.5 


Acres 
Percent 


1,420,692 
44.6% 


1,455,921 
42.1% 


- 2.5 


Acres 


678,363 


781,666 


-13.3 


Percent 


21.3% 


22.6% 




Acres 
Percent 


219,880 
6.9% 


207,991 
6.0% 


5.7 


Acres 
Percent 


700,192 
22.0% 


814,712 

23.6% 


-14.1 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964, 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-Pl, p. 2. 



79 



No. 44 



FARMS IN MARYLAND BY SIZE AND OWNERSHIP 
1964 and 1959 



Item 

All Farms l/ 
Under 10 Acres 

% of Total 
10 To 49 Acres 

% of Total 
50 To 99 Acres 

% of Total 
100 To 219 Acres 

% of Total 
220 To 499 Acres 

7. of Total 
500 And More Acres 

7. of Total 

All Farm Operators 

Full Owners Operating Farms 

% of Total 
Part Owners Operating Farms 

% of Total 
Managers Operating Farms 

% of Total 
Tenants Operating Farms 

% of Total 









7o Change 


Units 


1964 


1959 


1964/195! 


Number 


20,760 


25,122 


-17.4% 


Number 


2,006 


2,623 


-23.5 


Percent 


9.6% 


10.47o 




Number 


4,684 


6,008 


-22.0 


Percent 


22.67o 


23.97o 




Number 


3,826 


4,684 


-18.3 


Percent 


18.57o 


18.67o 




Number 


5,962 


7,310 


-18.5 


Percent 


28.77o 


29.17o 




Number 


3,313 


3,620 


- 8.5 


Percent 


15.97o 


14.47o 




Number 


969 


877 


10.4 


Percent 


4.77o 


3.57o 




Number 


20,760 


25,122 


-17.4 


Number 


12,909 


16,736 


-22.9 


Percent 


62.27o 


66.67o 




Number 


4,179 


4,009 


4.2 


Percent 


20.27o 


16.07o 




Number 


130 


331 


-60.8 


Percent 


0.67 o 


1.37c 




Number 


3,542 


4,046 


-12.5 


Percent 


17.07, 


16.17o 





l/ Figures differ slightly from table "Total Number of Maryland Farms, 
Acreage, and Value" because of different sampling procedures. 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-P1, p. 2. 



80 



No. 45 



VALUE OF FARM PRODUCTS SOLD BY SOURCE 
AND AS PERCENT OF TOTAL IN MARYLAND 
1964 and 1959 



1964 



1959 



Item 

All Farm Products Sold, 
Total Dollars 

Average Per Farm (Total All 
Farms) 

All Crops Sold 

Field Crops Other Than Veg, 
and Fruits & Nuts Sold 

Vegetables Sold 

Fruits & Nuts Sold 

Forest & Horticulture 
Specialty Products Sold 

All Livestock & Livestock 
Products Sold 

Dairy Products Sold 
Livestock Products Other 

Than Poultry & Poultry 

Products Sold 
Poultry & Poultry Products 

Sold 



Value 



% of 
Total 



Value 



% of % Change 
Total 1964/1959 



$275,830,652 100.0% $231,135,509 100.0% 19.3% 



13,287 




9,206 




44.4 


92,962,840 


33.8 


75,082,988 


32.5 


23.8 


66,644,349 


24.3 


51,392,612 


22.2 


29.6 


10,864,499 


3.9 


9,333,424 


4.0 


16.9 


4,832,619 


1.7 


4,374,582 


1.9 


10.5 


10,621,373 


3.9 


9,982,370 


4.4 


6.4 



182,401,842 66.2 156,052,521 67.5 16.8 

71,598,729 26.0 63,625,107 27.5 12.7 

30,146,599 10.9 36,010,334 15.6 -16.3 

80,656,514 29.3 56,417,080 24.4 42.9 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64 -PI, p. 2. 



81 



No. 46 NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL FARMS BY GROSS SALES IN MARYLAND 

1964 and 1959 



1964 1959 



Item 




Number 


% of 
All Farms 


Number 


7. of 
All Farms 


7 a Change 
1964/195$ 


$10,000 Gross or 


More 


6,984 


33.67. 


6,997 


27.9% 


- 1.07. 


$5,000 - $9,999 




2,996 


14.4 


4,064 


16.2 


-26.3 


$2,500 - $4,999 




2,843 


13.7 


3,535 


14.1 


-19.6 


$ 50 - $2,499 




1,644 


7.9 


1,383 


5.5 


18.8 


Total Commercial 




14,467 


69.6 


15,979 


63.6 


- 9.5 


Non-Commercial 




6,263 


30.1 


9,129 


36.4 


-31.4 


Total 




20,760 


100.0 


25,108 


100.0 


-17.4 


Farms Grossing $2 


,500 & More 


12,823 


61.7 


14,596 


58.1 


-12.2 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-P1, p. 2. 



82 



No. 47 WORKERS ON FARMS IN MARYLAND 

AUG. 1957-61, 1962 and 1963 



Item Aug. 1957-61 1962 1963 

Family Workers 39,000 38,000 37,000 

Hired Workers 20,000 18,000 17,000 

Total 59,000 56,000 54,000 

Source: Maryland State Board of Agriculture, Department of Markets, "Maryland 

Agricultural Statistics," Publication No. 7, June 1964, Table 51, 
p. 47. 

Numbers rounded to nearest thousand. 



83 



No. 48 NUMBER OF FARMS IN MARYLAND BY TYPE AND AS PERCENT OF TOTAL 

1964 and 1959 



Item 



1964 



Number 



% of 
Total 



1959 



Number 



% of 
Total 



% Change 
1964/1959 



All Commercial Farms 
Field Crop Farms Other Than 
Vegetable & Fruit-And-Nut 
Vegetable Farms 
Fruit-And-Nut Farms 
Poultry Farms 
Dairy Farms 
Other Livestock Farms 
General Farms 
Miscellaneous 



14,467 100.0% 15,979 



100.0% 



9.5% 



4,900 


33.9 


4,588 


28.7 


6.8 


352 


2.4 


342 


2.1 


2.9 


129 


.9 


130 


0.8 


- 0.8 


1,846 


12.7 


2,147 


13.4 


-37.3 


3,923 


27.1 


5,070 


31.7 


-22.7 


1,599 


11.0 


2,179 


13.7 


-26.7 


1,068 


7.3 


1,054 


6.6 


1.3 


650 


4.5 


469 


2.9 


38.6 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-P1, p. 2. 



84 



No. 49 



PRINCIPAL SOURCES OF FARM INCOME BY COMMODITIES 
1964, 1963 and 1960 (thousands of dollars) 



Item 

Crops 

ALL CROPS 

Tobacco 

Corn 

Soybeans 

Wheat 

Tomatoes 

Apples 

Snapbeans 

Sweet Corn 

Sweet Potatoes 

Hay 

Cucumbers 

Watermelons 

Peaches 

Asparagus 

Barley 

Green Peas 

Spinach 

Potatoes 

Strawberries 

Cantaloupes 

Lima Beans 

Other Vegetables & Melons 2/ 

Other Field Crops 3/ 

Other Fruits 4/ 

Total Field Crops 5/ 
Total Vegetables & Melons 6/ 
Total Fruits 7/ 
Forest Products 8/ 
Greenhouse & Nursery 









7 Change 


% Change 


1964 1/ 


1963 


1960 


1964/1963 


1964/1960 


92,098 


$ 97,837 


$ 91,593 


- 5.9% 


0.67 o 


15,702 


21,872 


19,689 


-28.2 


-20.2 


19,331 


17,640 


16,111 


9.6 


20.0 


10,559 


11,623 


10,807 


- 9.2 


- 2.2 


4,347 


5,889 


6,495 


-26.2 


-33.1 


4,623 


4,186 


4,234 


10.4 


9.2 


3,187 


3,089 


2,670 


3.2 


19.4 


2,089 


2,261 


2,653 


- 7.6 


-21.3 


1,782 


1,723 


2,275 


3.4 


-21.7 


1,554 


1,378 


1,486 


12.8 


4.6 


2,107 


1,942 


1,683 


8.5 


25.2 


1,608 


1,669 


1,229 


- 3.7 


30.8 


856 


890 


618 


- 3.8 


38.5 


1,274 


1,204 


1,103 


5.8 


15.5 


769 


858 


732 


-10.4 


5.1 


976 


860 


1,026 


13.5 


- 4.9 


812 


1,204 


902 


-32.6 


-10.0 


769 


1,089 


628 


-29.4 


22.5 


1,057 


802 


872 


31.8 


21.2 


522 


825 


676 


-36.7 


-22.8 


359 


396 


510 


- 9.3 


-29.6 


471 


366 


408 


28.7 


15.4 


2,536 


2,328 


1,844 


8.9 


37.5 


905 


922 


1,003 


- 1.8 


- 9.8 


383 


365 


419 


4.9 


- 8.6 


56,538 


62,928 


59,172 


-10.2 


- 4.5 


16,674 


16,970 


16,033 


- 1.7 


4.0 


5,366 


5,483 


4,868 


- 2.1 


10.2 


2,771 


2,500 


2,641 


10.8 


4.9 


10,749 


9,956 


8,879 


8.0 


21.1 



(continued on following page) 



85 



No. 49 PRINCIPAL SOURCES OF FARM INCOME BY COMMODITIES (cont'd.) 

I tern 

Livestock & Products 

Dairy Products 

Broilers 

Cattle & Calves 

Eggs 

Hogs 

Farm Chickens 

Turkeys 

Sheep & Lambs 

Honey 

Wool 

Other 9/ 

All Commodities 
Government Payments 
Total Receipts 

l/ Preliminary. 2/ Beets, carrots, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, 
kale, peppers & others. 3/ Rye, oats, lespedeza seed, red clover seed, popcorn 
and miscellaneous minor field and seed crops. 4/ Cherries, pears, plums, prunes, 
and miscellaneous fruits, nuts and berries. 5/ Includes potatoes & sweet 
potatoes. 7/ Includes strawberries. 8/ Includes maple sugar and syrup. 
9/ Miscellaneous livestock and poultry, livestock and poultry products, and 
beeswax. Excludes horses and mules after 1959. 

Source: Maryland Agricultural Statistics, June 1966, Maryland State Board 
of Agriculture, Department of Markets, Publication #15, Maryland 
Crop Reporting Service, Table 58, p. 52. 

Note: Figures here differ slightly from those on pp. 81 and 89 because of 

variation in collection of data. This data based on sampling estimate 
while USDA figures based on enumeration of data. 









% Change 


% Change 


1964 1/ 


1963 


1960 


1964/1963 


1964/1960 


193,566 


194,484 


184,189 


- 0.5 


5.1 


75,659 


72,400 


71,947 


4.5 


5.2 


75,636 


77,393 


66,951 


- 2.3 


13.0 


23,148 


25,847 


24,998 


-10.4 


- 7.4 


8,657 


8,436 


10,302 


2.6 


-16.0 


8,064 


7,748 


7,404 


4.1 


8.9 


469 


716 


914 


-34.5 


-48.7 


963 


1,085 


822 


-11.2 


17.2 


342 


339 


380 


0.9 


-10.0 


330 


241 


211 


36.9 


56.4 


109 


99 


104 


10.1 


4.8 


189 


180 


156 


5.0 


21.2 


$285,664 


$292,321 


$275,782 


- 2.3 


3.6 


5,462 


5,224 


2,799 


4.6 


95.1 


$291,126 


$297,545 


$278,581 


- 2.2 


4.5 



86 



No. 50 



HARVEST OF PRINCIPAL CROPS IN MARYLAND 
1964 and 1959 



Quantity Harvested 



Item 

Corn 

Hay 

Soybeans 

Wheat 

Barley 

Oats 

Tobacco 

Sweet Corn 

Rye 

Tomatoes 

Snap Beans 

Green Peas 

Cucumbers & Pickles 

Sweet Potatoes 

Irish Potatoes 

Asparagus 

Watermelons 

Green Lima Beans 

Cantaloupes 

Strawberries 

Apples 

Peaches 







% Change 


1964 


1959 


1964/1959 


507,483 acres 


461,666 acres 


9.9% 


365,908 


408,493 


-10.5 


216,890 


193,958 


11.8 


129,993 


150,287 


-13.6 


84,046 


73,223 


14.7 


31,024 


52,728 


-41.2 


37,214 


39,608 


- 6.1 


26,137 


30,906 


-15.5 


16,572 


17,213 


- 3.8 


9,221 


11,753 


-21.6 


12,988 


10,410 


24.7 


6,445 


5,894 


9.3 


3,272 


4,016 


-18.6 


2,960 


3,988 


-25.8 


2,582 


3,770 


-31.6 


3,748 


3,224 


16.2 


4,282 


3,037 


40.9 


2,926 


2,894 


1.1 


1,094 


1,456 


-24.9 


664 


717 


- 7.4 


70,263,227 pounds 


74,887,008 pounds 


- 6.2 


19,154,960 


21,772,272 


-12.1 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-Pl, pp. 5 and 6. 



87 



No. 51 



LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY, POPULATION AND SALES, MARYLAND 

1964 and 1959 



Cattle & Calves: 
Number On Farms 
Number Sold Alive 
Milk Cows, Number 



1964 



415,208 
250,821 
175,215 



1959 



475,995 
237,449 
198,069 



% Change 
1964/1959 



-12.8% 

5.6 
-11.6 



Hogs & Pigs: 

Number On Farms 
Number Sold Alive 

Sheep & Lambs: 
Number On Farms 
Number Sold Alive 
Wool Shorn, Pounds 

Chickens: (4 months older) 
Number On Farms 

Number Sold (Including Broilers) 
Number Of Broilers Sold 
Eggs Sold, Dozens 

Turkey Hens Kept For Breeding, 

Number 
Turkeys Raised, Number 

Value Of: (in dollars) 
All Livestock & Livestock Products 
Sold 

Poultry & Poultry Products 
Dairy Products 

Livestock & Livestock Products 
(other than poultry & dairy 
products) 



150,744 
245,818 



23,337 

16,696 
132,385 



1,982,681 

117,297,232 

116,253,756 

24,302,335 



9,183 
213,886 



216,595 
222,446 



38,014 

30,448 

210,229 



2,093,034 
81,906,363 
80,823,000 
18,205,423 



6,414 
237,970 



$182,401,842 $156,052,521 
80,656,514 56,417,080 
71,598,729 63,625,107 



30,146,599 36,010,334 



-30.5 
10.5 



-38.7 
-45.2 
-37.1 



■ 5.3 
43.2 
43.8 
33.4 



43.1 
-10.2 



16.8 
42.9 
12.5 



-16.3 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-P1, p. 4. 



88 



No. 52 



FARM PRODUCTS SOLD IN MARYLAND 
1964 and 1959 
RANKED BY VALUE SOLD IN 1964 



1964 



1959 



Item 

Poultry & Poultry 
Products 

Dairy Products 

Field Crops Other Than 
Vegetables & Fruits & 
Nuts Sold 

Livestock Products — 
Other Than Poultry & 
Poultry Products 

Vegetables 

Forest & Horticulture 
Specialty Products 

Fruits & Nuts 

TOTAL 



Value of 


Percent Of 


Value of 


Percent Of 


Farm Products 


Total Cash 


Farm Products 


Total Cash 


Sold 


Receipts 
29.3% 


Sold 


Receipts 


$ 80,656,514 


$ 56,417,080 


24.4% 


71,598,729 


26.0 


63,625,107 


27.5 


66,644,349 


24.2 


51,392,612 


22.2 



30,146,599 



10.9 



10,864,499 


3.9 


10,621,373 


3.8 


4,832,619 


1.8 


$275,364,682 





36,010,334 



15.6 



9,333,424 


4.0 


9,982,370 


4.3 


4,374,582 


1.9 


$231,135,509 





Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Agriculture: 1964," 
Preliminary Report, Maryland, AC 64-Pl, p. 2. 



89 



No. 53 ACREAGE AND ATTENDANCE IN MARYLAND STATE PARKS AND FORESTS 

1965 and 1960 



Area in Acres 



Attendance 



State Parks Total 

Assateague State Park 
Cunningham Fall State Park 
Dans Mountain State Park 
Deep Creek Lake State Park 
Elk Neck State Park 
Ft. Frederick State Park 
Ft. Tonoloway State Park 
Gatnbrill State Park 
Gathland State Park 
Greenbrier State Park 
Gunpowder State Park 
Jane's Island State Park 
Martinak State Park 
Patapsco State Park 
Patuxent State Park 
Point Lookout State Park 
Purse State Park 
Rocks State Park 
Rocky Gap State Park 
Sandy Point State Park 
Seneca State Park 
Shad Landing State Park 
Smallwood State Park 
South Mountain Watershed Area 
Susquehanna State Park 
Tuckahoe State Park 
Washington Monument State Park 
Wye Oak State Park 

State Forests Total 

Cedarville State Forest 
Doncaster State Forest 
Elk Neck State Forest 
Green Ridge State Forest 
Pocomoke State Forest 
Potomac State Forest 
Savage River State Forest 

New Germany State Park 

Big Run State Park 
Seth Demonstration Forest 
Swallow Falls State Forest 

Herrington Manor State Park 

Picnic Area State Park 
Wicomico State Forest 

Total State Forests and Parks 



1965 


1960 


36,309 


18,743 


625 


540 


4,455 


4,447 


479 


322 


1,775 


1,723 


1,575 


657 


279 


279 


26 


26 


1,138 


1,138 


135 


126 


1,034 


n/a 


6,582 


1,100 


2,749 


N/A 


99 


n/a 


6,592 


6,278 


312 


n/a 


498 


n/a 


148 


n/a 


269 


203 


789 


n/a 


680 


764 


630 


340 


545 


n/a 


333 


333 


3,386 


n/a 


657 


361 


393 


n/a 


104 


104 


22 


2 


18,649 


119,057 


3,520 


3,520 


1,464 


1,464 


2,742 


2,742 


25,558 


25,631 


11,851 


12,251 


12,052 


12,053 


52,770 


52,708 


N/A 


N/A 


n/a 


n/a 


125 


125 


7,457 


7,453 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


n/a 


1,110 


1,110 



1965 

3,321,190 
160,000 
293,261 

8,343 
161,683 
362,507 
127,009 

4,452 

100,596 

40,503 

n/a 

35,670 

n/a 

22,171 
1,245,897 

n/a 

20,944 

n/a 

117,485 



n/a 



391,881 

9,388 

33,760 

17,010 

n/a 

106,350 



62,280 



n/a 

62,2 

n/a 

584,982 

93,904 

990 

56,685 

51,480 

77,679 

1,992 

146,882 

114,058 

32,824 

n/a 

155,370 
94,978 
60,392 



7 J 
n/a 



1960 
3,263,684 

n/a 

60,468 
24,655 
68,928 
183,532 
40,677 

n/a 

50,352 
69,331 

n/a 
n/a 
n/a 
n/a 

2,388,671 

n/a 
n/a 
n/a 

60,273 

n/a 

257,264 
4,536 

n/a 

5,509 

n/a 

n/a 
n/a 

49,488 

n/a 

549,755 

55,948 

2,810 

n/a 

60,805 

47,746 

1,954 

161,575 

103,647 

57,928 

n/a 

218,917 

154,917 

64,000 

n/a 



154,958 137,800 3,906,172 3,813,439 



Source: Maryland Department of Forests and Parks, Board of Natural Resources, 
"Annual Report 1965," Tables 24, 25 and 27, pp. 108, 109 and 111 
respectively. 

90 



No. 54 NUMBER OF HOTELS, MOTELS, AND OTHER TOURIST ACCOMMODATIONS 

IN MARYLAND, FOR 1963 AND 1958 BY COUNTIES l/ 



Motels, and other 



Total 


Hotels 


Tourist Ac 


;ommodations 


1963 


1958 


1963 


1958 


1963 


1958 


629 


632 


183 


212 


446 


420 


31 


32 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


40 


36 


6 


4 


34 


32 


64 


67 


46 


63 


18 


4 


51 


67 


3 


6 


48 


61 


12 


8 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


24 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


30 


23 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


29 


38 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


25 


22 


5 


3 


20 


19 


39 


43 


4 


7 


35 


36 


33 


35 


7 


n/a 


26 


n/a 


15 


12 


N/A 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


110 


81 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 



County 

State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore County 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Frederick 

Harford 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



l/ Data on a county basis not available for counties not listed. Counties 
listed are those that have 200 or more service trade establishments 
according to definition of 1963 Census of Business. 

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Business: 1963," Selected 
Services, Maryland, BC 63-SA22, Table 5, p. 14. 



Note: Much data are available only on an aggregate basis and not by counties. 



91 



No. 55 HUNTING AND FRESH WATER 1/ FISHING LICENSES IN MARYLAND BY COUNTIES 

1965 and 1960 



Hunting Fishing 

Issued by County 1965 1960 1965 1960 



Allegany 16,598 10,206 9,872 

Anne Arundel 19,929 10,690 6,020 

Baltimore 37,425 18,539 25,343 

Baltimore City 15,853 12,485 7,996 

Calvert 3,025 2,047 111 

Caroline 3,858 2,505 409 

Carroll 8,953 6,127 4,878 

Cecil 10,237 6,986 5,020 

Charles 6,252 3,836 672 

Dorchester 5,133 4,118 153 

Frederick 12,328 8,049 10,497 

Garrett 8,851 5,068 9,494 

Harford 9,994 6,610 6,788 

Howard 2,941 1,972 1,088 

Kent 5,750 3,926 296 

Montgomery 15,334 8,934 17,791 

Prince George's 25,941 13,481 13,153 

Queen Anne's 3,282 2,567 160 

St. Mary's 3,994 3,493 517 

Somerset 2,705 2,069 14 

Talbot 5,307 3,502 171 

Washington 16,149 9,759 14,532 

Wicomico 6,625 4,870 635 

Worcester 4,853 3,416 235 



Out-of-State 47 662 1,984 

TOTAL 251,364 155,917 137,829 

1/ No license required for salt water (tidal) . 

Source: Maryland Board of Natural Resources, "The Maryland Conservationist," 
Vol. XLII, No. 6, November -December 1965, p. 22. 



92 



No. 56 



NEW CONSTRUCTION PLANS - VALUE BY TYPE, 1965 l/ 
(Millions of dollars) 



Ty^e 



1965 



1964 



1963 1960 3/ 1950 3/ 



Public Works 
Contracts: 



Waterworks 






31 




3 


2 


13 


7 


Sewerage 






17 




27 


21 


13 


9 


Bridges 






32 




4 


8 


18 


11 


Earthwork, 


















Irrigation 


h 
















Drainage 






2/ 




24 


3 


.7 


.9 


Streets, Roads 




1 




161 


8 


65 


41 


Buildings 






211 




145 


176 


65 


62 


Private Buildin 


g 
















Contracts: 


















Industrial 






51 




87 


24 


70 


15 


Commercial 






807 




556 


512 


298 


78 


Unclassified 






9 




62 


19 


21 


11 


Total Maryland 




1 


,158 


1 


,069 


772 


564 


235 


Total U.S. 




48, 


,435 


44, 


,405 


33,236 


22,904 


12,351 


Ratio Md./U.S. 


(%) 




2.4 




2.4 


2.3 


2.5 


1.9 



l/ New Construction Plans does not include residential construction but does 
include mass housing. 

2/ Less than $500,000. 

3/ 1960 and 1950 represent Engineering Construction Contracts awarded in 
Maryland. 

4/ New Construction Plans includes U.S. construction projects estimated to 
cost at least the following minimum values: industrial plant and non- 
building - $100,000, building other than industrial - $500,000. 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 
1966," (87th edition), Table 1106, p. 744. 



93 



No. 57 CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, WORK ACTUALLY DONE, VALUE l/ 

1955, 1960, 1963, 1964 and 1965 
(Millions of dollars) 



1965 1964 1963 1960 1955 

Maryland 1,278 1,133 1,027 706 821 

U.S. 2/ 49,272 47,299 45,546 36,318 23,745 

Ratio Md./U.S. 2.6 2.4 2.3 1.9 3.5 

l/ Construction Contracts represents the sum of the value of residential 
building contracts, non-residential building contracts and non-building 
construction contracts. 

2/ Excludes Alaska and Hawaii. Total for 37 Eastern States and D.C. for 
1955; 48 States and D.C. thereafter. 



Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census. "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 
1966," (87th edition), Table 1103, p. 742. 



94 



VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED IN MARYLAND, 1960 TO 1965 







% Change 




% Change 






% Change 






Over 




Over 






Over 




Non-residential 


Previous 


Residential 


Previous 


Tot, 


al Res . & Non- 


Previous 


Year 
1960 


Valuation 


Year 


Valuation 
$280,849,000 


Year 


Re 

$ 


3. Valuation 
706,425,000 


Year 


$257,466,000 


- 0.7 


-17.1 


- 5.2 


1961 


310,227,000 


20.4 


332,734,000 


18.4 




642,961,000 


- 9.0 


1962 


291,819,000 


- 6.0 


405,572,000 


21.8 




697,391,000 


8.4 


1963 


387,704,000 


32.8 


491,390,000 


21.1 




879,094,000 


26.0 


1964 


359,499,000 


- 7.3 


624,287,000 


27.0 




983,786,000 


11.9 


1965 


425,603,000 


18.3 


682,356,000 


9.3 


1 


,107,959,000 


1.2 



Source: F. W. Dodge Company, "Monthly Construction Contracts Reports." 



95 



No. 59 NEW BUILDING PERMITS AUTHORIZED IN MARYLAND 

1955, 1959, 1964 and 1965 



Year 



1955 
1959 
1964 
1965 



Private 
Residential 
Dwelling Units 


% Change 

Over 
Previous 

Year 


29,655 


— 


27,006 


- 9.0 


42,870 


58.7 


53,707 


25.2 



Source: From unpublished data supplied by Maryland State Planning Department 



96 





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98 



No. 62 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION BY TYPE IN MARYLAND FOR 1965 AND 1960 



1965 1/ 



1960 2/ 



County Division Pleasure Commercial 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne ' s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Out of State 

Total 

Dealer and other 

miscellaneous 

classes 
Total registration 



32,028 7,128 

93,583 17,151 

249,544 48,487 

234,641 29,677 

6,110 1,922 



7,928 4,825 
24,772 7,835 
16,972 5,272 
12,868 3,925 
11,055 
30,212 

6,714 
33,899 



4,418 
8,485 
2,920 
7,970 
19,598 6,616 



6,357 



6,377 
10,926 

5,684 

9,437 
37,744 
20,662 

9,016 

n/a 

1,297,147 



2,456 



202,123 -21,025 223, 
208,897 29,401 



2,750 
3,281 
2,225 
3,418 
9,960 
8,136 
4,239 

n/a 



243,522 



Total 

39,156 

110,734 

298,031 

264,318 

8,032 

12,753 

32,607 

22,244 

16,793 

15,473 

38,697 

9,634 

41,869 

26,214 

8,813 

-.23,148 

238,298 

9,127 

14,207 

7,909 

12,855 

47,704 



136 28,798 



13,255 
N/A 

1,540,669 
220,222 



1,760,891 



Pleasure 

26,952 

64,402 

237,937 

179,151 

3,513 

8,154 

19,376 

14,365 

10,180 

9,418 

24,071 

5,732 

24,325 

13,212 

5,438 

141,935 

132,550 

5,318 

9,021 

5,280 

7,864 

30,456 

17,133 

7,861 

5 

1,003,649 



Commercial 

5,743 
11,257 
45,136 
21,911 
1,389 
3,859 
6,133 
4,141 
2,920 
3,574 
6,578 
2,619 
5,774 
3,235 
2,035 
15,225 
18,616 
2,368 
2,501 
1,979 
2,953 
8,061 
6,727 
3,588 
1,512 

189,834 



Total 



32 


,695 


75 


,659 


283 


073 


201 


,062 


4 


,902 


12 


013 


25 


,509 


18. 


,506 


13 


,100 


12 


,992 


30 


,649 


8 


,351 


30. 


099 


16j 


447 


7 


,473 


157 


,160 


151 


,166 


7 


,686 


11 


,522 


7 


,259 


10. 


,817 


38 


,517 


23 


,860 


11. 


,449 


1. 


,517 


1,193. 


,483 


179 


988 



1,373,471 



1/ 1965 Registration Year - April 1, 1965, to April 30, 1966. 
2/ 1960 Registration Year - April 1, 1960, to April 28, 1961. 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Motor Vehicles, "Segregation of 
Classifications by Political Subdivision," for registration years 
1965 and 1960. 



99 



No. 63 AVERAGE DAILY VEHICLE MILES , STATE MAINTAINED ROADS, 1965 AND 1959 



1965 


1959 


% Change 


ADVM 


ADVM 


1965/1959 


616,205 


469,176 


31.3 


2,926,700 


1,949,033 


50.1 


4,401,484 


2,750,101 


60.0 


167,705 


121,620 


37.8 


241,840 


215,873 


12.0 


531,600 


449,604 


18.2 


610,140 


674,050 


- 9.5 


569,540 


482,169 


18.1 


271,540 


215,738 


25.8 


1,162,558 


906,510 


28.2 


250,610 


205,721 


21.8 


990,553 


1,035,556 


- 4.4 


808,968 


598,089 


35.2 


204,320 


180,860 


12.9 


3,603,239 


2,071,669 


74.0 


4,218,847 


2,066,216 


104.1 


411,352 


337,907 


21.7 


366,684 


209,926 


74.6 


239,111 


352,575 


-32.2 


403,019 


317,458 


26.9 


1,006,264 


662,173 


51.9 


497,631 


448,887 


10.8 


409,842 


380,389 


7.7 


24,909,752 


17,101,300 


45.6 



County 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne ' s 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

TOTAL 



Source: State Roads Commission of Maryland, Bureau of Highway Statistics, 
"Allocation of Maintenance Funds Report," for years 1965 and 1959. 



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S 



101 



No. 65 WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF MARYLAND'S PRINCIPAL WATERWAYS 

EXCLUDING THE PORT OF BALTIMORE AND INCLUDING THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 

1964 and 1959 (SHORT TONS) 



Waterway 

Chester River, Maryland 

Tred Avon River, Maryland 

Choptank River, Maryland 

Cambridge Harbor, Maryland 

Nanticoke River, Delaware & Maryland 

Wicomico River, Maryland (Eastern Shore) 

Crisfield Harbor, Maryland 

Pocomoke River, Maryland 

Chincoteague Bay, Maryland & Virginia 

Waterway On the Coast of Virginia - 

From Chesapeake Bay to Chincoteague Bay, 

Virginia 

Total 

Port of Baltimore 

TOTAL 



Tons 




Tons 


%, Change 


1964 




1959 


1964/1959 


65,731 




52,292 


25.6% 


77,619 




86,901 


-10.7 


205,030 




116,370 


76.1 


96,254 




78,829 


22.1 


335,332 




280,540 


19.5 


680,670 




452,287 


50.4 


35,412 




45,460 


-22.2 


48,996 




55,775 


-12.2 


8,167 




26,757 


'69.5 


97,090 




98,748 


- 1.7 


1,650,301 


1 


,293,959 


27.5 


48,220,024 


40 


,223,607 


19.8 


49,870,325 


41 


,517,566 


20.1 



Source: U.S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, "Waterborne Commerce 
of the United States: 1964," Part 1, "Waterways & Harbors, Atlantic 
Coast," pp. 239-255. 



102 



No. 66 TOTAL WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

1955-1964 (SHORT TONS) 



Year 




Tonnage 


Passengers 


1955 




45,823,878 


374,654 


1956 




51,579,613 


731,696 


1957 




52,014,472 


355,918 


1958 




41,703,370 


289,693 


1959 




40,223,607 


293,331 


1960 




43,419,627 


251,359 


1961 




37,814,650 


47,824 


1962 




42,587,893 


267,773 


1963 




43,197,300 


111,275 


1964 




48,220,024 


93,392 


% Change 


1964/1955: 


5.2% 




7o Change 


1964/1960: 


11.0% 




% Change 


1964/1963: 


11.6% 





Vessel 
Arrivals 

5,369 
5,735 
6,089 
5,615 
5,442 
5,511 
5,132 
5,284 
5,329 
5,367 



Source: U.S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, "Waterborne Commerce 
of the United States: 1964," Part 1, "Waterways & Harbors, Atlantic 
Coast." 



103 



No. 67 



RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS 

IN FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 

(QUANTITIES SHOWN IN TONS OF 2,240 POUNDS) 





Export 


Trade 


% of 


Import 


Trade 


°/o of 


Port 


1965 


1964 


Change 


1965 


1964 


Chanp 


New York, New York 


5,938,214 


6,716,651 


-11.6 


42,319,821 


36,746,875 


15.2 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


2,542,634 


3,384,241 


-24.9 


17,836,116 


16,014,152 


11.4 


BALTIMORE, MD . 


5,248,924 


6,399,449 


-18.0 


17,635,780 


16,128,203 


9.3 


Norfolk, Va. 


22,199,107 


21,086,919 


5.3 


2,934,911 


2,470,357 


18.8 


Portland, Me. 


37,723 


33,393 


13.0 


13,071,875 


13,603,214 


- 3.9 


Newport News, Va. 


9,115,625 


9,019,017 


1.1 


2,345,232 


2,587,232 


- 9.4 


New Orleans, La. 


10,665,044 


10,924,910 


- 2.4 


3,623,973 


3,260,446' 


11.1 


Houston, Texas 


8,654,598 


8,184,330 


5.7 


3,650,580 


3,364,241 


8.5 


Mobile, Ala. 


1,587,634 


1,733,482 


- 8.4 


7,702,455 


6,356,920 


21.2 


Baton Rouge, La. 


3,817,589 


4,616,785 


-17.3 


5,761,919 


4,726,875 


21.9 


Paulsboro, N. J. 


106,920 


122,188 


-12.5 


9,090,133 


8,421,250 


7.9 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


2,171,563 


2,762,054 


-21.4 


6,786,473 


6,499,375 


4.4 


Corpus Cristi, Texas 


2,076,027 


2,135,402 


- 2.8 


4,368,304 


4,629,643 


- 5.6 


Long Beach, Cal. 


4,158,929 


3,826,920 


8.7 


4,602,589 


3,454,107 


33.2 



Total U. S. Ports 



154,479,823 153,914,688 



0.3 240,525,536 222,082,851 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, "Port of 
Baltimore and Other Maryland Ports: 1965," p. 6. 



104 



No. 68 RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS 

IN FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE 

TOTAL FOREIGN TRADE 

(QUANTITIES SHOWN IN TONS OF 2,240 POUNDS) 



Rank 







% of 






1965 


1964 


Change 


1965 


1964 


48,258,035 


43,463,526 


11.0 


1 


1 


25,134,018 


23,557,276 


6.7 


2 


2 


22,884,704 


22,527,652 


1.6 


3 


3 


20,378,750 


19,398,393 


5.1 


4 


4 


14,289,017 


14,185,356 


0.7 


5 


5 


13,109,598 


13,636,607 


- 3.9 


6 


6 


12,305,178 


11,548,571 


6.6 


7 


8 


11,460,848 


11,606,249 


- 1.3 


8 


7 


9,579,508 


7,343,660 


2.5 


9 


12 


9,290,089 


8,090,402 


14.8 


10 


11 


9,197,053 


8,543,438 


7.7 


11 


10 


8,958,036 


9,261,429 


- 3.3 


12 


9 


8,761,518 


7,281,027 


20.3 


13 


13 


7,260,088 


6,472,991 


12.2 


14 


15 


395,005,359 


375,997,539 


5.1 







Port 

New York, New York 
Norfolk, Va. 
BALTIMORE, MD . 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New Orleans, La. 
Portland, Me. 
Houston, Texas 
Newport News, Va. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Paulsboro, N. J. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Long Beach, Cal. 
Tampa, Fla. 

Total U. S. Ports 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, "Port of 
Baltimore and Other Maryland Ports: 1965," p. 6. 



105 



No. 69 



IMPORT AND EXPORT TONNAGE AND VALUE FOR THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 1955-1965 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 



Source: 



Export 

Tonnage Value 
(2240 lbs.) ($) 



Import 

Tonnage Value 

(2240 lbs.) ($) 



Total 



7,426,964 $575,565,000 15,549,598 



8,629,107 
8,462,009 
5,706,562 
3,739,866 
4,397,188 
4,047,582 
4,620,846 
6,086,291 
6,399,449 



597,845,000 
722,535,000 
505,000,000 
425,541,000 
575,307,000 
587,130,000 
574,036,000 
696,017,000 
707,683,000 



18,183,661 
20,149,152 
16,675,670 
16,992,903 
18,001,211 
13,576,610 
16,334,180 
15,584,323 
16,128,203 



5,248,924 678,087,000 17,635,780 



$404,306,000 
530,460,000 
617,466,000 
543,306,000 
624,923,000 
620,735,000 
540,073,000 
640,717,000 
695,046,000 
722,145,000 
758,766,000 



Tonnage 
(2240 lbs.) 



Value 
($) 



22,976,562 979,871,000 

26.812.768 1,128,305,000 
28,611,161 1,340,001,000 
22,382,232 1,048,306,000 

20.732.769 1,050,464,000 
22,398,399 1,196,042,000 
17,624,192 1,127,203,000 
20,955,026 1,214,753,000 
21,670,614 1,391,063,000 
22,527,652 1,429,828,000 
22,884,704 1,436,853,000 



Maryland Port Authority, Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, "Port of 
Baltimore and Other Maryland Ports: 1965," p. 5. 



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108 



No. 72 DISTRIBUTION OF EXPORT CARGO SHIPPED FROM THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 

ARRANGED BY PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES 
IN ORDER OF TONNAGE AND BY TRADE AREAS 
1965 









RANK BY 


COUNTRY OF UNLADING 


LONG TONS 


VALUE 


VALUE 


West Germany 


804,074 


$62,865,930 


1 


France 


766,295 


50,541,274 


2 


Italy 


675,953 


40,718,116 


4 


Japan 


446,336 


22,612,818 


11 


Netherlands 


354,247 


29,398,077 


9 


Pakistan 


243,612 


38,789,037 


5 


Yugoslavia 


204,842 


5,009,113 


23 


United Kingdom 


192,550 


50,127,849 


3 


India 


172,017 


34,602,566 


6 


Belgium 


162,124 


31,176,152 


8 


Brazil 


149,773 


7,956,783 


18 


Argentina 


84,164 


10,420,668 


15 


Spain 


65,248 


18,403,325 


12 


Venezuela 


62,243 


32,749,138 


7 


Turkey 


61,881 


8,838,197 


17 


Chile 


60,840 


11,675,798 


14 


Portugal 


54,209 


7,720,670 


20 


Viet-Nam 


44,947 


11,145,855 


16 


Tunisia 


41,111 


4,182,183 


25 


Switzerland 


40,312 


12,037,465 


13 


Haiti 


33,063 


2,272,686 


26 


Norway 


31,246 


5,963,154 


22 


Denmark 


29,697 


5,793,928 


23 


Republic of South Africa 


29,350 


25,952,816 


10 


Ireland 


26,138 


2,214,631 


27 


Peru 


25,339 


6,385,299 


20 


Republic of the Philippines 


23,079 


8,008,856 


18 


East Germany 


21,704 


1,287,845 


28 




EXPORTS BY TRADE 


AREA 


RANK BY 


TRADE AREA 


LONG TONS 


VALUE 


VALUE 


Europe 


3,534,186 


$351,667,997 


1 


Asia 


1,019,843 


147,444,928 


2 


South America 


421,521 


86,972,568 


3 


Africa 


145,565 


62,597,170 


4 


North America 


94,034 


21,586,910 


5 


Australia & Oceania 


9,158 


7,817,849 


6 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, 
"Port of Baltimore and Other Maryland Ports: 1965," p. 15. 



109 



No. 73 



IMPORT TRADE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 
ARRANGED BY PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES IN ORDER OF TONNAGE 
AND BY TRADE AREAS 
1965 









RANK BY 


COUNTRY OF LADING 


LONG TONS 


VALUE 


VALUE 


Venezuela 


5,105,445 


$49,038,774 


5 


Canada 


3,623,236 


42,605,862 


6 


Liberia 


1,802,850 


21,747,696 


11 


Chile 


1,410,184 


30,357,772 


9 


Netherlands Antilles 


877,250 


12,642,376 


16 


Brazil 


834,280 


32,691,240 


8 


Mexico 


439,948 


14,476,236 


14 


Trinidad & Tobago 


432,178 


6,555,841 


20 


Peru 


312,877 


53,299,909 


4 


Western Africa, nes 


257,845 


7,425,547 


18 


Republic of South Africa 


223,754 


53,741,641 


3 


India 


190,759 


20,002,348 


12 


Republic of the Philippines 


172,464 


13,947,621 


16 


Japan 


157,329 


36,566,953 


7 


France 


147,685 


24,852,159 


10 


West Germany 


146,690 


117,466,819 


1 


Zambia 


137,502 


3,556,307 


22 


Belgium 


103,668 


14,183,133 


14 


United Kingdom 


92,560 


56,198,325 


2 


Dominican Republic 


90,634 


10,932,902 


18 


British Guiana 


75,791 


2,205,137 


25 


Austria 


70,573 


4,617,793 


21 


Congo 


69,089 


2,917,701 


23 


Ecuador 


65,926 


2,594,508 


24 


Ivory Coast 


49,815 


1,633,354 


27 


Turkey 


48,526 


1,844,109 


26 


Tunisia 


43,657 


463,078 


28 


Italy 


42,058 


14,553,964 


13 




IMPORTS BY TRADE 


AREA 


RANK BY 


TRADE AREA 


LONG TONS 


VALUE 


VALUE 


South America 


7,865,926 


184,530,731 


2 


North America 


5,632,914 


102,325,213 


3 


Africa 


2,667,983 


97,304,690 


5 


Europe 


811,717 


268,748,214 


1 


Asia 


636,887 


101,699,072 


4 


Australia and Oceania 


20,366 


4,157,950 


6 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, 
"Port of Baltimore and Other Maryland Ports: 1965," p. 98. 



110 



No. 74 



FRIENDSHIP INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT OPERATIONS, 1965 AND 1960 



Passengers: 

Incoming 
Outgoing 

Total Passengers 

Express : 



1965 



896,559 

896,755 

1,793,314 



1960 



370,301 
376,389 
746,690 



% Change 
1965/19b0 



142% 

138 

140 



Incoming (lbs.) 


3,256,089 


1,881,919 


73 


Outgoing (lbs.) 


2,441,419 


1,583,882 


54 


Total Express (lbs.) 


5,697,508 


3,465,801 


64 



Freight: 



Incoming (lbs.) 




18,857,761 


7,702,637 


144 


Outgoing (lbs.) 




20,051,228 


5,199,398 


285 


Total Freight 


(lbs.) 


38,908,989 


12,902,035 


201 



Air Traffic Operations: 



Itinerant \J 










Commercial Air 


Carrier 


67,885 


49,302 


37 


Civil 




68,249 


43,146 


58 


Armed Forces 




5,802 


17,555 


-202 


Local 2/ 










Armed Forces 




13,806 


55,316 


-300 


Civil 3/ 




18,098 


23,128 


- 22 


Total Operations 


173,840 


188,447 


- 8 



\j With origin or destination beyond the local tower. 

2/ Remaining under control of local tower. 

3/ Includes airline personnel familiarization operations 



Source: The Airport Board of Baltimore, "Annual Report: 1965," p. 11 



111 



No. 75 



COMMERCIAL AIRPORTS, STATE OF MARYLAND, 1965 







No. of 


Airport 


County 


Runways 


Aberdeen 


Harford 


1 


Aldino 


Harford 


3 


Annapolis (Lee) 


Anne Arundel 


1 


Bar H Sky Park 


Cecil 


1 


Beltsville 2/ 


Prince George's 


2 


Cambridge \J 2/ 


Dorchester 


1 


Church Hill 


Queen Anne' s 


1 


College Park 


Prince George's 


2 


Crisfield l/ l] 


Somerset 


2 


Croom 


Prince George's 


2 


Cumberland l/ 2/ 


Allegany 


3 


Davis 


Montgomery 


1 


Deep Creek 


Anne Arundel 


2 


Eastern 


Baltimore 


2 


Easton l/ 2/ 


Talbot 


2 


Fallston 


Harford 


1 


Farmington 


Cecil 


2 


Frederick l/ 2/ 


Frederick 


3 


Free Way 2/ 


Prince George's 


3 


Friendship _l/ 2/ 


Anne Arundel 


3 


Garrett County l/ 2/ 


Garrett 


1 


Gill 


Kent 


1 


Hagerstown \J 2/ 


Washington 


2 


Half Pone Point 


St. Mary's 


2 


Hyde Field l] 


Prince George's 


2 


Kentmorr 


Queen Anne ' s 


1 


Lovett 


Cecil 


3 


Maryland 


Charles 


1 


Mexico Farms 


Allegany 


2 


Montgomery Cty. 






Airpark l/ l] 


Montgomery 


2 


Ocean City 1/ 


Worcester 


1 


Park Hall/Lexington Park 


St. Mary's 


1 


Piney Point 2/ 


St. Mary's 


1 


Aqua Land Sky Park 


Charles 


1 


Galaxy Airways 


Baltimore 


1 


Reservoir 


Carroll 


1 


Rock Point 


Charles 


1 


P. G. Airpark, Inc. 2/ 


Prince George's 


1 


Russell 


Kent 


1 


Rutherford 


Baltimore 


2 


Salisbury jj l] 


Wicomico 


3 


Suburban 2/ 


Prince George's 


1 


Tilghman-Whipp Airport & 






Seaplane Base 


Talbot 


1 


Westminster 


Carroll 


1 



l/ Municipal and/or county-owned airport. 
2/ Hard surface runway. 



Source: Maryland State Aviation Commission, "Maryland Airport Directory: 

pp. 9-27. 

112 



1965," 



No. 76 
COMMERCIAL AIRPORTS AND HELIPORTS IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND FOR 1965, BY COUNTY 



Allegany: 

Cumberland 
Mexico Farms 

Anne Arundel: 

Annapolis (Lee) 
Deep Creek 
Friendship 

Baltimore City: 

Pier 4, Pratt St. (Heliport) 

Baltimore County: 
Eastern 
Galaxy Airways 
Rutherford 

Carroll: 

Reservoir 
Westminister 

Cecil: 

Bar H Sky Park 
Farmington 
Lovett, Inc. 

Charles: 

Aqua -Land Sky Park 

Maryland 

Rock Point 

Dorchester: 

Cambridge 

Frederick: 

Frederick 

Garrett: 

Garrett County 

Harford: 

Aberdeen 

Aldino 

Fallston 



Montgomery: 
Davis 
Montgomery County Airpark 

Prince Geor ge ' s : 
Beltsville 
College Park 
Croom 
Free Way 
Hyde Field 

Prince George's Airpark, Inc. 
Suburban 

Queen Anne's: 

Church Hill 
Kentmorr 

St. Mary's: 

Half Pone Point 

Park Hill/Lexington Park 

Piney Point 

Somerset: 

Crisfield 

Talbot: 

Easton 

Tilghman-Whipp Airport and Seaplane Base 

Washington: 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico: 

Salisbury 

Worcester: 

Ocean City 



Kent: 



Gill 
Russell 



Source: Maryland State Aviation Commission, "Maryland Airport Directory: 1965," 
pp. 9-27. 



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119 



No. 83 



COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND AREA BY STAND -SIZE CLASS 
IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES FOR 1963 



Stand-Size Class 



Maryland Pennsylvania Delaware Virginia W. Virginia United State; 



Total 1,000 Acres 
% of U.S. Total 


2,897 

.56% 


15,089 
2.95% 


391 
.07% 


15,829 
3.10% 


Saw timber 
1,000 Acres 


1,416 


4,033 


211 


7,184 


Pole timber 
1,000 Acres 


896 


7,451 


129 


6,623 



Seedling & Sapling 
1,000 Acres 

Not Stocked 



451 



134 



3,416 



489 



45 



1,744 



278 



2.23% 



5,605 



3,105 



2,445 



234 



508,845 
100.00% 

208,945 



164,794 



99,573 



35,533 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965 
Appendix, Table 3, p. 143. 



120 



No. 84 



NET VOLUME OF LIVE SAWTIMBER IN SAWTIMBER STANDS 

ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 

AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES FOR 1963 



Stand-Size Class 

Saw timber Million 
Bd. Ft. 



Maryland Pennsylvania Delaware Virginia W. Virginia United States 
8,792 27,732 1,255 37,120 30,399 2,536,799 



% of U.S. Total 


.34% 


1.08% 


.04% 


1.44% 


1.18% 


100.00% 


Softwood 


1,669 


2,351 


546 


12,701 


1,565 


2,058,022 


% of U.S. Total 


.08% 


.11% 


.02% 


.60% 


.07% 


100.00% 


Hardwood 


7,123 


25,381 


709 


24,419 


28,834 


478,777 


% of U.S. Total 


1,4% 


5.2% 


.14% 


5.0% 


5.9% 


100.0% 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 11, p. 155. 



121 



No. 85 NET VOLUME OF LIVE SAWTIMBER AND GROWING-STOCK ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LANDS 

IN MARYLAND BY SPECIES GROUP, JANUARY 1, 1963 



Species 



Live Saw timber 





(Million Bd. Ft.; 


Eastern Softwoods, Total 


1,669 


White & Red Pine 


32 


Shortleaf & Loblolly Pine 


1,114 


Other 


523 


Eastern Hardwoods, Total 


7,123 


White Oak 


1,034 


Red Oak 


910 


Other Oaks 


1,377 


Soft Maple & Beech 


646 


Sweet Gum 


817 


Tupelo & Black gum 


228 


Hickory 


314 


Yellow Poplar 


1,338 


Other 


457 



Growing Stock 
Million Cu. Ft. 

Eastern Softwoods, Total 
Shortleaf & Loblolly Pine 
Other Yellow Pines 
Other Softwoods 

Eastern Hardwoods, Total 
Oak 
Beech, Yellow Birch & 

Hard Maple 
Hickory 
Sweet gum 

Tupelo & Blackgum 
Yellow Poplar 
Other 



8. 
4i 
2' 



- 2,8i 

- lJ 

1. 



1 
3 

41 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States,' 
Appendix, Tables 12 and. 14, pp. 159 and 161 respectively. 



February 1965, 



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123 



No. 87 ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF GROWING STOCK 

ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND 
BY SPECIES GROUP, MARYLAND, 1962 



Species Group 



Softwoods 
Hardwoods 



Annual 
cut 

Thousand 
cu. ft. 

17,332 

30,418 



Net 
growth 

Thousand 
cu. ft. 

22,000 

107,900 



All Species 



47,750 



129,900 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 25, p. 172. 



124 



No. 88 



ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF LIVE SAWTIMBER 
ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND 
BY SPECIES GROUP, MARYLAND, 1962 



Species Group 



Annual 
cut 

Thousand 
bd. ft. 



Net 
growth 

Thousand 
bd. ft. 



Softwoods 
Hardwoods 

All Species 



65,203 
115,958 



181,161 



65,000 
311,000 



376,000 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 28, p. 175. 



125 



No. 89 



NUMBER OF FOREST FIRES AND AREA BURNED IN MARYLAND 

1965 and 1960 



Anne Arundel 

Allegany 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

Montgomery 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Number of 


Area Burned 


Number of 


Area Burned 


Fires 


in 1965 


Fires 


in 1960 


in 1965 1/ 


in Acres 


in 1960 


in Acres 


14 


236 


24 


412 


15 


431 


19 


240 


81 


162 


50 


218 


9 


42 


1 


1 


28 


31 


12 


76 


8 


77 


12 


35 


41 


362 


30 


107 


16 


93 


4 


14 


31 


254 


15 


34 


42 


66 


28 


37 


60 


46 


23 


17 


64 


137 


11 


16 


7 


17 


15 


72 


6 


6 


5 


8 


37 


65 


14 


168 


11 


11 


6 


22 


13 


61 


5 


33 


44 


81 


28 


31 


3 


7 


11 


34 


8 


8 


4 


26 


22 


310 


12 


147 


74 


93 


20 


18 


18 


36 


11 


8 



State Total 



652 



2,632 



360 



1,774 



1/ Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1965. 



Source: Maryland Department of Forests and Parks, Board of Natural 
Resources, "Annual Report 1965," Table 23, p. 107. 



126 



No. 90 



FOREST FIRES IN MARYLAND BY CAUSE FOR FISCAL YEAR 1965 l/ 



County 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne ' s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



No. of 

Fires 

in 

FY 1967 

15 
14 
81 

9 
28 

8 
41 
16 
31 
42 
60 
64 

7 

6 
13 
37 
11 

3 
44 

8 
22 
74 
18 



Lightning Railroad Campfire 



18 
4 
2 



10 



Brush Incen- 
Smoking Burning diary 



5 


2 


2 


4 


5 


3 


2 


3 


23 


8 


24 


14 


6 




3 




17 


7 




1 


3 


2 


1 


2 • 


5 


9 


7 


11 


7 


3 


2 


3 


12 


7 




10 


15 


7 


10 


9 


20 


10 


5 


6 


12 


13 


16 


18 


1 


1 




1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 




1 


9 


16 


2 


4 


14 


4 




2 


4 


1 




1 


1 


21 


9 


1 


9 


4 


1 




2 


15 


3 


2 


2 


38 


11 


8 


12 


8 


5 




4 



State Total 



652 



44 



21 



243 



105 



92 



140 



l/ Year ending June 30, 1965. 



Source: Maryland Board of Natural Resources, "Annual Report 1965," Table 23, p. 107 



127 



No. 91 VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MARYLAND, BY COUNTIES l/ 

1964, 1963 and 1960 



County 1964 1963 1960 

Allegany $ 2,166,485 $ 2,389,429 $ 1,912,778 

Anne Arundel 2,409,000 1,842,345 l] 

Baltimore 13,494,468 13,317,155 11,278,181 

Calvert 2/ 2/ 2/ 

Caroline ZJ ZJ ZJ 

Carroll 2/ 2/ 2/ 

Cecil 3,753,436 4,389,880 1,537,378 

Charles 2/ 348,000 2/ 

Dorchester 2/ 2/ 2/ 

Frederick 9,108,075 8,485,833 7,905,813 

Garrett 4,183,582 4,133,380 3,343,982 

Harford 1,590,265 1,549,300 1,036,017 

Howard 2/ 2/ 2/ 

Kent 2/ 38,419 17,000 

Montgomery 2/ 2/ 2/ 

Prince George's 9,287,600 8,296,197 6,784,477 

Queen Anne's 2/ 2/ 67,000 

St. Mary's 146,000 2/ 2/ 

Talbot " 2/2/2/ 

Washington ll ll ll 

Wicomico 112,284 2/ 2/ 

Worcester 37,315 37,315 2/ 

Undistributed 3/ 27,716,950 25,310,600 21,645,268 

Total 4/ $73,893,000 $70,250,000 $55,527,000 

l/ Somerset County is not listed because no production was reported. 

2/ Figure withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data. 

3/ Includes values indicated by footnote marked 2/ and gem stone unspecified 

by counties. 

4/ Excludes values of clays and stone used in manufacturing lime and cement. 

Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, "Minerals Yearbook 
1964," Vol. Ill, Area Reports: Domestic, Table 5, p. 498. 



128 





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129 



No. 93 



MARYLAND FISH CATCH BY DOLLAR VALUE 
1965, 1960, 1955 and 1950 
(thousands of dollars) 



Species 

Finfish: 
Alewives 
Butterf ish 
Carp 

Catfish and Bullheads 
Croaker 
Eels 

Flounder 
Menhaden 
Scup (porgy) 
Sea Bass 
Sea Trout 
Shad 

Striped Bass 
Swellfish 
Tuna 

White Perch 
Yellow Perch 
Total all other species 



1965 



1960 



1955 



1950 



; 33 


$ 53 


$ 103 


$ 116 


13 


# 


# 


# 


9 


# 


# 


# 


30 


39 


21 


37 


# 


156 


200 


351 


19 


# 


# 


# 


148 


165 


158 


80 


150 


# 


# 


# 


38 


5 


5 


31 


29 


# 


# 


#' 


22 


13 


41 


84 


148 


207 


212 


226 


529 


675 


643 


578 


37 


# 


# 


# 


98 


# 


# 


# 


188 


85 


78 


98 


30 


9 


11 


22 


102 


232 


198 


359 



Total 



$1,623 $1,639 $1,670 $1,982 



Shellfish: 

Crabs, blue hard 

soft and peeler 
Clams, hard 

soft 

surf 
Oysters 
Total all other shellfish 



2,509 


1,541 


914 


790 


919 


611 


173 


428 


132 


74 


22 


96 


1,548 


1,594 


431 


-- 


22 


34 


141 


10 


6,458 


8,426 


7,786 


5,521 


24 


17 


10 


62 



Total 



$11,612 $12,297 $9,477 $6,907 



Grand Total 



$13,235 $13,936 $11,147 $8,889 



# - Included in ' r all other species" total for applicable year. 



Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish & Wildlife Service, "Maryland 
Landings and Chesapeake Fisheries," for years reported. 



130 



No. 94 



MARYLAND FISH CATCH BY QUANTITY 
1965, 1960, 1955 and 1950 
(thousands of dollars) 



Species 

Finfish: 
Alewives 
Butterfish 
Carp 

Catfish and bullheads 
Croaker 
Eels 

Flounder 
Menhaden 
Scup (porgy) 
Sea Bass 
Sea Trout 
Shad 

Striped Bass 
Swellfish 
Tuna 

White Perch 
Yellow Perch 
Total all other species 

Total 



1965 



1960 



1955 



1950 



2,270 


3,525 


5,145 


5,927 


164 


# 


# 


# 


259 


# 


# 


# 


383 


566 


695 


588 


# 


586 


1,705 


2,518 


193 


# 


# 


# 


795 


1,048 


1,108 


543 


8,026 


# 


# 


# 


422 


104 


124 


612 


243 


# 


* 


# 


248 


271 


412 


592 


1,325 


1,333 


1,464 


1,443 


2,880 


4,409 


2,572 


3,038 


1,750 


# 


# 


# 


832 


# 


# 


# 


1,408 


876 


782 


1,149 


211 


63 


66 


153 


13,217 


8,403 


4,279 


4,966 



34,626 21,184 18,352 21,529 



Shellfish: 










Crabs, blue hard 


31,979 


27,068 


15,232 


27,522 


soft and peeler 


2,694## 


2,788## 


400 


966 


Clams, hard 


237 


172 


58 


192 


soft 


7,654 


5,569 


1,294 


-- 


surf 


275## 


420## 


141 


7 


Oysters 


8,635## 


11,771## 


3,178 


2,770 


Total all other shellfish 


144 


141 


-- 


-- 



Total 



51,618 47,929 36,8971/ 45,563.1/ 



Grand Total 



86,244 



69,113 



55,249 67,092 



# - Included in "all other species" total for applicable year. 

## - Weight in pounds available for 1960 and 1965 only. 1950 and 1955 show 

dozens of crabs and bushels of clams and oysters, 
l/ Will not total due to variances in converting dozens and bushels to pounds. 

Totals shown are U.S. figures. 



Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish & Wildlife Services, "Maryland 
Landings and Chesapeake Fisheries," for years reported. 



131 



No. 95 



MARYLAND SEAFOOD PRODUCTS BY VALUE 
1964, 1960, 1955 and 1950 
(thousands of dollars) 



Item 

Alewives: 
canned 
canned roe 
salted or pickled 

Crabs: 

meat (cooked, fresh & frozen) 
specialties, frozen (cakes, 

delived, etc.) 
meal 
soft blue, frozen 

Clams: 

shucked, fresh & frozen 
breaded, frozen 
chowder 

Oysters: 

shucked, fresh & frozen 
breaded, frozen & raw 

Unclassified: 

fish & shellfish (canned) 
fish & shellfish, frozen 
fish, cured or smoked 
fish & shellfish specialties 
fish & shellfish by-products 



1964 



1960 



1955 



1950 



N/A 


n/a 


n/a 


$ 155 


N/A 


n/a 


n/a 


131 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


260 



$4,426 $3,867 $3,638 4,234 



1,383 
157 

n/a 


2,550 
171 

n/a 


137 
229 

n/a 


102 
241 
162 


2,653 
479 
207 


1,587 
344 

n/a 


n/a 
n/a 
n/a 


n/a 
n/a 

35 


5,802 
196 


8,086 
373 


10,286 
709 


10,946 

N/A 


7,137 

6,969 

4,481 

N/A 

1,335 


3,852 

4,898 

3,624 

N/A 

1,587 


980 

n/a 

2,898 

1,629 

920 


687 
194 

2,164 

N/A 

2,618 



Source: U. S. Department of Interior, Fish & Wildlife Service, "Chesapeake 
Fisheries," for years reported. 

Note: The data marked n/A in some years is included in other items of the same 
listing. The portions broken out are presented in different formats 
in the various years. 



132 



No. 96 



MARYLAND SEAFOOD PRODUCTS BY QUANTITY 
1964, I960, 1955 and 1950 



Item 

Alewives: 
canned 
Canned roe 
salted or pickled 



Unit 
XOOO) 



cases 
lbs. 



1964 



n/a 
n/a 
n/a 



1960 



n/a 
n/a 
n/a 



1955 



n/a 
n/a 
n/a 



1950 



29 

8 

2,116 



Crabs: 

meat (cooked, fresh & frozen) 
specialties, frozen (cakes, 

delived, etc.) 
meal 
soft blue, frozen 



tons 
lbs. 



3,791 4,403 4,218 4,814 



1,922 
4 

n/a 



1,539 
4 

n/a 



240 
4 

n/a 



134 

4 

374 



Clams: 

shucked, fresh & frozen 
breaded, frozen 
chowder 



gal. 
lbs. 
cases 



525 

483 

23 



299 
325 

n/a 



n/a 
n/a 
n/a 



n/a 
n/a 



Oysters: 

shucked, fresh & frozen 
breaded, frozen & raw 

Unclassified: 

fish & shellfish (canned) 
fish & shellfish, frozen 
fish, cured or smoked 
fish & shellfish specialties 
fish & shellfish by-products 



gal. 



cases 

lbs. 
it 

it 

it 



774 
160 



661 
19,070 
7,936 
N/A 

n/a 



1,195 
288 



411 

14,076 

7,924 

N/A 

1,587 



1,684 
824 



77 

n/a 

6,423 

3,437 

920 



2,059 
N/A 



76 
320 
1,531 
N/A 

n/a 



Source: U. S. Department of Interior, Fish & Wildlife Service, "Chesapeake 
Fisheries.," for years reported. 

Note:The data marked N/A is in some years included in other items of the same 
listing. Portions broken out are presented in different formats in 
various years. 



133 



No. 97 NUMBER OF FISHERMEN AND GEAR IN MARYLAND 

1964, 1960, 1955, and 1950 



1964 1960 1955 1950 



9,271 


9,096 


10,101 


8,607 


475 


389 


256 


23 


61 


61 


87 


113 


6,267 


5,798 


6,611 


6,011 


115 


113 


201 


279 


n/a 


242 


203 


147 


471 


431 


485 


335 


1,545 


1,517 


1,331 


446 


660 


452 


105 


235 


2,212 


1,983 


2,195 


1,131 


236 


316 


575 


592 


644 


1,488 


348 


373 


160 


252 


617 


711 


63,915 


58,000 


45,400 


24,030 


6,845 


6,796 


15,995 


20,293 


960 


600 


1,260 


510 


323 


249 


403 


133 


459 


462 


550 


408 


213 


199 


90 


34 


4 


11 


36 


n/a 


187 


216 


297 


306 


4,593 


4,698 


4,454 


4,008 


85 


145 


115 


60 





6 


25 


98 


25 


33 


25 


13 



Total fishermen 
Vessels - motor 
Vessels - sail 
Boats 

Haul seines 
Anchor gill net 
Drift gill net 
Stake gill net 
Hand lines 
Crab trot line 
Pound nets 
Fyke nets 
Dip nets 
Crab pots 
Eel pots 
Fish pots 
Turtle pots 
Scrapes 
Clam dredges 
Crab dredges 
Oyster dredges 
Oyster tongs 
Clam tongs 
Rakes 
Otter trawls 



Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, 
"Maryland Landings," and "Chesapeake Fisheries," for years 
reported. 



134 



No. 98 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS IN MARYLAND 
1955 Through 1964 



Year Ending June 30 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



Total 


Public 
GRAND TOTAL 


Non-public 


1,314 


942 


372 


1,331 


943 


388 


1,359 


960 


399 


1,373 


979 


394 


1,388 


990 


398 


1,401 


1,008 


393 


1,434 


1,031 


403 


1,491 


1,045 


446 


1,529 


1,071 


458 


1,558 


1,101 

TOTAL ELEMENTARY 


457 


1,145 


796 


349 


1,156 


790 


366 


1,164 


797 


367 


1,166 


802 


364 


1,178 


812 


366 


1,173 


814 


359 


1,194 


827 


367 


1,236 


830 


406 


1,260 


844 


411 


1,270 


861 
TOTAL HIGH 


409 


292 


221 


71 


300 


223 


77 


316 


232 


84 


335 


251 


84 


337 


251 


86 


353 


258 


95 


365 


267 


98 


375 


276 


99 


402 


285 


117 


403 


291 


112 



Note: Data for elementary schools include demonstration schools at State 
Teachers Colleges. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 3, p. 101. 



135 



No. 99 NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN MARYLAND SCHOOLS 

1955 Through 1964 



Year Ending June 30 Total Public Non-public 

GRAND TOTAL 

1955 20,166 16,848 3,318 

1956 21,563 17,881 3,682 

1957 22,969 19,165 3,804 

1958 24,554 20,590 3,964 

1959 26,136 21,948 4,188 

27,717 23,356 4,361 

29,271 24,663 4,608 



1960 
1961 



1962 30,813 25,978 4,835 



1963 
1964 



33,260 28,171 5,089 
35,346 30,037 5,309 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



1955 9,600 

1956 10,025 

1957 10,561 

1958 11,440 

1959 12,120 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1964 15,668 

TOTAL HIGH 



12,561 
13,008 
13,571 
14,572 



1955 7,248 

1956 7,856 

1957 8,604 

1958 9,150 

1959 9,828 

1960 10,795 

1961 11,655 

1962 12,407 

1963 13,599 

1964 14,369 



Note: Data for elementary schools include demonstration schools at State 
Teachers Colleges. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 3, p. 101. 



136 



No. 100 NUMBER OF PUPILS ATTENDING PUBLIC AND NON -PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN MARYLAND 

1955 Through 1964 



Year Ending June 30 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



Total 



566,900 
601,359 
635,984 
665,963 
695,668 

■7 T7 /. "3 1 



727,431 
,497 
,906 
831,501 
870,523 



386,103 
405,758 
422,143 
440,970 
455,497 
465,071 
479,951 
496,217 
516,269 
536,782 



180,797 
195,601 
213,841 
224,993 
240,171 
262,360 
278,546 
295,689 
315,232 
333,741 



Public(l) Non-public 
GRAND TOTAL 



472,006 
499,561 
526,651 
551,127 
574,845 
600,753 
626,430 
655,310 
691,134 
727,272 

TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



94,894 
101,798 



109,333 

114,£ 

120, a 

126,6 

132, C 

136,5 

140,367 



143,251 



305,860 
,179 
,057 
,580 
,239 
,552 
,520 
,329 
402,219 
421,443 



319,179 
330,C 
344, f 
354,2 
359, f 
370,f 
384,2 
402,219 



J44,58U 

354,239 
359,552 



TOTAL HIGH 



166,146 
180,382 

ia£ en/. 



196,594 
206,547 
220,606 



255,910 
270,981 
288,915 
305,829 



80,243 

86,579 

92,086 

96,390 

101,258 

105,519 

109,431 

111,888 

114,050 

115,339 



14,651 
15,219 
17,247 
18,446 
19,565 
21,159 
22,636 
24,708 
26,317 
27,912 



(1) Excludes Duplicates 



Note: Data for elementary schools include demonstration schools at State 
Teachers Colleges. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 3, p. 101. 



137 



No. 101 PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, STATE OF MARYLAND 

TOTAL ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL, ENROLLMENTS BY COUNTY 

1965, 1964 and 1960 



Local Unit 


1965 


1964 


1960 


Total State 


730,085 


705,021 


584,258 


Allegany 


16,539 


16,887 


15,971 


Anne Arundel 


56,678 


54,101 


42,050 


Baltimore City 


174,684 


172,145 


156,392 


Baltimore 


109,138 


106,218 


86,285 


Calvert 


5,179 


5,098 


4,328 


Caroline 


4,906 


4,795 


4,433 


Carroll 


12,823 


12,454 


10,661 


Cecil 


10,907 


10,887 


9,632 


Charles 


9,498 


8,999 


7,391 


Dorchester 


6,502 


6,533 


6,102 


Frederick 


16,764 


16,260 


14,271 


Garrett 


5,089 


5,075 


4,796 


Harford 


21,654 


20,583 


16,662 


Howard 


11,038 


10,389 


7,627 


Kent 


3,539 


3,491 


3,339 


Montgomery 


96,742 


92,846 


72,331 


Prince George's 


107,925 


98,589 


69,630 


Queen Anne's 


4,251 


4,196 


3,711 


St. Mary's 


8,016 


7,757 


6,122 


Somerset 


4,508 


4,496 


4,339 


Talbot 


4,452 


4,446 


4,116 


Washington 


20,854 


20,796 


18,271 


Wicomico 


12,278 


11,875 


10,342 


Worcester 


6,121 


6,105 


5,456 



% Change 
1965/1964 

3.57o 
-2.1 

4.8 

1.5 

2.7 

1.6 

2.3 

3.0 

0.2 

5.5 
-0.5 

3.1 

0.3 

5.2 

6.2 

1.4 

4.2 

9.5 

1.3 

3.3 

0.3 

0.1 

0.3 

3.4 

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% Change 
1965/1960 

24.97o 

3.5 
34.8 
11.7 
26.5 
19.7 
10.7 
20.3 
13.2 
28.5 

6.5 
17.5 

6.1 
30.0 
44.7 

6.0 
33.7 
55.0 
14.5 
30.9 

3.9 

8.2 
14.1 
18.7 
12.2 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, Research and Development 
Report, December 1965. 



138 



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139 



No. 103 AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARY PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF MARYLAND 
1955-1964 



Average Annual Salary Per Teacher And Principal 



Year Ending June 30 


Combined 


Elementary 


HiRh 


1955 


$4,163 


$4,104 


$4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1957 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 


1958 


4,944 


4,821 


5,092 


1959 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1960 


5,493 


5,436 


5,556 


1961 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 


1962 


6,009 


6,019 


6,184 


1963 


6,239 


6,147 


6,334 


1964 


6,416 


6,243 


6,605 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 101, p. 213. 



140 



No. 104 AVERAGE NUMBER OF PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL IN MARYLAND 

1955-1964 



Average Number of Pupils Belonging 
Per Teacher and Principal 



Year Ending June 30 

1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



l/ Excludes Kindergartens And Elementary Schools At State Teachers Colleges. 

Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 59, p. 169. 



Combined 


Elementary 


U 


High 


26.8 


30.4 




22.0 


26.8 


30.4 




22.0 


26.3 


30.0 




21.7 


25.1 


28.0 




21.5 


24.6 


27.3 




21.4 


24.2 


26.9 




21.2 


23.9 


26.6 




21.0 


25.1 


28.2 




21.9 


23.1 


25.7 




20.3 


23.3 


25.9 




20.5 



141 



No. 105 



PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES IN MARYLAND 
1955-1964 



High School Graduates 



Year Ending June 30 

1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 

% change 1955 to 1964 



Total 

15,161 
16,767 
17,122 
18,380 
20,462 
23,854 
26,923 
26,533 
28,534 
34,271 

126% 



Bo£S 

7,313 

8,019 

8,368 

8,891 

9,861 

11,560 

13,142 

13,015 

14,299 

17,049 



133% 



Girls 



7,848 

8,748 

8,754 

9,489 

10,601 

12,294 

13,781 

13,518 

14,235 

17,222 



119% 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 26, p. 124. 



142 



No. 106 



NUMBER AND PERCENT OF MARYLAND HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
CONTINUING EDUCATION YEAR FOLLOWING GRADUATION 

1954-1963 



Number Continuing Education Percent Continuing Education 



Year of 
Graduation 



Total Number 
of Graduates 



Higher 
Education l/ Other 2/ 



Higher 
Education l/ Other 2/ 



Boys 



Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls 



1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 



6,670 

7,313 

8,019 

8,368 

8,891 

9,861 

11,560 

13,142 

13,015 

14,299 



7,400 

7,848 

8,748 

8,754 

9,489 

10,601 

12,294 

13,781 

13,518 

14,235 



2,212 
2,294 
2,400 
2,675 
3,096 
3,469 
4,527 
5,171 
5,244 
5,497 



1,742 


155 


1,810 


200 


1,970 


163 


2,226 


161 


2,536 


228 


2,883 


239 


3,728 


330 


4,084 


353 


4,266 


385 


5,015 


503 



714 

755 

781 

806 

962 

1,081 

1,260 

1,457 

1,386 

1,541 



33.2 
31.4 
29.9 
32.0 
34.8 
35.2 
39.2 
39.3 
40.3 
38.5 



23.5 
23.1 
22.5 
25.4 
26.7 
27.2 
30.3 
29.6 
31.5 
35.3 



2.3 
2.7 
2.0 
1.9 
2.6 
2.4 
2.9 
2.7 
3.0 
3.5 



9.6 
9.6 
8.9 

9.2 
10.1 
10.2 
10.2 
10.6 
10.3 
10.8 



l/ College or University, teacher training, or art, drama, or music school. 
2/ Trade, commercial or vocational; college prep or post-graduate high school, 
or nursing. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Tables 28 and 29, 
pp. 126 and 127 respectively. 



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145 



No. 109 CAPITAL OUTLAY EXPENDITURES BY MARYLAND LOCAL BOARDS OF EDUCATION 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1964 



Local Unit 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George* s 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total 



Expenditures for Capital Outlay 



Administration Community 
Buildings Colleges 



Elementary High 
$86,781,942 $33,808,988 $47,639,956 $1,395,926 $3,937,072 



1,218,986 
",851 
,426 
,615 
361,054 
194,551 

one l. -i -i 



8,851,1 
14,426,882 
14,615,763 



395,477 

182,103 
1,740,396 

673,646 
1,435,996 

121,366 
1,823,972 
1,346,808 



14 
21 



199,598 
,835,755 

S.Z./. OOC 



,554,295 
171,723 
327,889 
97,270 
455,159 
419,396 
1,100,975 
231,225 



4,073 

3,635,630 

7,283,653 

4,572,689 

12,294 

6,344 

222,290 

25,154 

3*86,574 

39, 1 
382,2 



39^662 
,399 



874,843 
809,012 

16,009 
4,643,639 
9,515,865 

16,907 
144,495 

55,697 
263,275 
298,570 
492,536 
107,378 



1,188,328 

4,926,672 

3,876,935 

9,381,463 

347,405 

188,207 

165,549 

148,931 

1,346,671 

633,984 

1,048,007 

121,366 

258,043 

534,403 

183,589 

9,937,002 

11,954,229 

154,816 

183,394 

41,573 

191,884 

101,721 

604,460 

121,324 



12,619 

16,835 

906,603 

119,843 

1,355 

7,638 
8,018 
3,788 



1,032 
3,393 

229,523 
78,202 



575 
3,979 
2,523 



13,966 

272,520 

2,359,691 

541,768 



3,363 



5,590 
690,054 

25,591 
5,999 



18,530 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Ninety-Eighth Annual Report 
of the State Board of Education," Maryland, 1964, Table 110, p. 222. 



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148 a. 



No. Ill 



TWO-YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES IN MARYLAND, 1966 



Two-year Colleges 



Allegany Community College 
Anne Arundel Community College 
Baltimore Junior College 
Catonsville Community College 
Charles County Community College 
Essex Community College 
Frederick Community College 
Hagerstown Junior College 
Harford Junior College 
Montgomery Junior College 
Mount Providence Junior College 
Prince George's Community College 
St. Charles College 
St. Mary's Seminary-Junior College 
St. Peter's College 
Trinitarian College 
Villa Julie College 
Xaverian College 



Public 


Men 








or 


Women 


Church 


Degrees 


Private 


Coed 


Connection 


Offered l/ 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Private 


W 


Roman 


Catholic 


A. 


Public 


C 






A. 


Private 


M 


Roman 


Catholic 




Public 


C 






A. 


Private 


M 


Roman 


Catholic 




Private 


M 


Roman 


Catholic 


A. 


Private 


W 


Roman 


Catholic 


A. 


Private 


M 


Roman 


Catholic 


A. 



l/ A. -Associate. 



Source: Maryland State Board of Education, State Accredited Maryland Colleges 
and Universities, January 1966. 



149 



No. 112 FOUR -YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MARYLAND, 1966 



Four-year Colleges 
and Universities 



Baltimore College of Commerce 

Baltimore Hebrew College 

Bowie State College 

College of Notre Dame of Maryland 

Columbia Union College 

Coppin State Teachers College 

Eastern College 

Frostburg State College 

Goucher College 

Hood College 

Johns Hopkins University 

Loyola College 

Maryland Institute 

Maryland State College 

Morgan State College 

Mt. St. Agnes College 

Mt. St. Mary's College 

Ner Israel Rabbinical College 

Peabody Institute 
St. John's College 
St. Joseph College 
St. Mary's Seminary and 

University 
Salisbury State College 
Towson State College 
University of Baltimore 
University of Maryland 
Washington College 
Western Maryland College 
Woodstock College 



Public 


Men 










or 


Women 


Church 


Degrees 


Private 


Coe 


d 


Connection 


( 


Dffered 4/ 


Private 


C 






A 


.A. . j Jj , b . 


Private 


C 




Jewish 




B. 


Public 


C 








B. 


Private 


W 




Roman Catholic 




B. 


Private 


c 








B. 


Public 


c 








B. 


Private 


c 








A., B. 


Public 


c 








B., M. 


Private 


w p 


1/ 






B., M. 


Private 


w ' 




United Church 
of Christ 




B. 


Private 


M,C 


H 




B 


., M., D. 


Private 


M,C 


3/ 


Roman Catholic 




B., M. 


Private 


C 








B., M. 


Public 


C 








B. 


Public 


C 








B., M. 


Private 


w 




Roman Catholic 




B. 


Private 


M 




Roman Catholic 




B. 


Private 


M 




Jewish 




M., D. 
Rabbi 


Private 


C 






B 


., M., D. 


Private 


c 








B., M. 


Private 


w 




Roman Catholic 




B. 


Private' 


M 




Roman Catholic 


B 


« , -Li . , u . 


Public 


C 








B. 


Public 


C 








B., M. 


Private 


C 






A 


., B., M. 


Public 


C 






B 


., M., D. 


Private 


c 








B. 


Private 


c 




Methodist 




B., M. 


Private 


M 




Roman Catholic 


B 


• j i-> • j u • 



l/ Graduate School is co-educational. 

2/ Graduate and Professional Schools and Evening Division are co-educational. 

3/ Evening College is co-educational. 

4/ A. -Associate, B. -Bachelor ' s, M. -Master's, D. -Doctor's, L. -Licentiate 

Source: Maryland State Board of Education, State Accredited Maryland Colleges 
and Universities, January 1966. 



150 



No. 113 



STATE OF MARYLAND NET CASH EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEARS 1965, 1964 and 196c 



Expenditures 



1965 



1964 



1960 



Education 

State and Federal Aid 
to Political Sub- 
divisions 
Other State Programs 
Highways 

State Roads 
Tax Distributions To 
Political Subdivisions 
Health, Hospitals, Mental 

Hygiene 
Payment of Sundry Revenues 
to Political Subdivisions 
Public Welfare 
Public Debt 

Land, Buildings, Equipment 
Public Safety 
Legislative, Judicial, 
Executive and General 
Control 
Retirement 

Employment Security Admin- 
istration, Md. Port 
Authority 
Correction 

Natural Resources, Recreati 
and Information 

Total Net Expenditures 



$000 


% of 
Total 


$000 


% of 
Total 


$000 


% of 
Total 


% Change 
1965/1964 


% Change 
1965/1960 


214,025 


29.7 


183,299 


29.2 


129,800 


28.5 


16.8 


64.9 


134,111 

79,914 

159,570 

116,013 


18.6 
11.1 
22.1 
16.1 


110,540 
72,759 

135,901 
93,869 


17.6 
11.6 
21.6 
14.9 


87,400 

42,400 

115,500 

83,300 


19.2 

9.3 

25.4 

18.3 


21.3 

9.8 

17.4 

23.6 


53.4 
88.5 
38.2 
39.3 


43,557 


6.0 


42,032 


6.7 


32,200 


7.1 


3.6 


35.3 


64,125 


8.9 


58,746 


9.4 


40,500 


8.9 


9.2 


58,3 


60,417 
73,624 
41,588 
29,095 
17,781 


8.3 
10.1 
5.8 
4.0 
2.5 


55,606 
61,720 
38,526 
20,382 
18,439 


8.9 
9.8 
6.1 
3.3 

2.9 


37,400 
32,500 
26,900 
18,600 
12,200 


8.2 
7.2 
5.9 
4.1 
2.7 


8.7 

19.3 

7.9 

42.7 

- 3.6 


61.5 
126.5 
54.6 
56.4 
45.7 


19,912 
14,177 


2.8 
2.0 


17,700 
13,143 


2.8 

2.1 


12,100 
10,500 


2.7 
2.3 


12.5 
7.9 


64.6 
35.0 


8,871 
10,803 


1.2 
1.5 


7,630 
9,985 


1.2 
1.6 


7,400 
6,500 


1.6 
1.5 


16.3 
8.2 


19.9 
66.2 


n 

7,589 


1.1 


7,082 


1.1 


4,700 


1.0 


7.2 


61.5 


721,577 


100.0 


628,159 


100.0 


454,600 


100.0 


14.9 


58.7 



Source: Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, "Condensed Annual Report: 1965," p. 4. 



151 



No. 114 STATE OF MARYLAND NET CASH RECEIPTS, FISCAL YEARS 1965, 1964, 1960 l/ 



RECEIPTS 



TAXES AND FEES: 

Income Taxes, Total 
Individuals 
Corporations 
Retail Sales and Use 

Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax 
Motor Vehicles Taxes 
Registration and Fines 
Local "in lieu" fees 
Titling tax 
Sundry Fees, Service 

Charges, etc. 
Tobacco Taxes, Total 
Real and Personal 

Property Tax 
Franchise Taxes 
Tax On Insurance 

Companies 
Alcoholic Beverage 

Excises 
Tax On Horse Racing 
Death Taxes 
Others 

Hunting and Fishing 

Licenses 
Amusements and 
Admissions 

TOTAL TAXES AND FEES 

BOND ISSUES 

State of Maryland 
Construction Issues 



FEDERAL GRANTS 
Highways 
Public welfare and 

health 
Employment Security 

Administration 
Public education 
Other 



1965 



1964 



1960 





% of 




% of 




% of 


7 Change 


% Chang 


$000 


Total 


$000 


Total 


$000 


Total 


1965/1964 


1965/19 


168,455 


23.2 


147,049 


23.3 


105,400 


22.1 


14.6% 


59.8% 


140,886 


19.4 


123,436 


19.6 


85,200 


17.9 


14.1 


65.4 


27,569 


3.8 


23,613 


3.7 


20,200 


4.2 


16.8 


36.5 


113,733 


15.7 


103,003 


16.3 


74,100 


15.6 


10.4 


53.5 


80,476 


11.1 


65,83d 


10.4 


53,200 


11.2 


22.2 


51.3 


64,927 


9.0 


54,309 


8.6 


40,100 


8.4 


19.6 


61.9 


30,062 


4.2 


28,535 


4.5 


21,600 


4.5 


5.4 


39.2 


9,387 


1.3 


8,883 


1.4 


7,300 


1.5 


5.7 


2a. 6 


25,478 


3.5 


16,891 


2.7 


11,200 


2.4 


50.8 


127.5 


38,912 


5.4 


33,130 


5.2 


27,500 


5.8 


17.5 


41.5 


23,659 


3.2 


22,894 


3.6 


16,900 


3.6 


3.3 


40.0 


17,747 


2.4 


14,125 


2.3 


12,000 


2.5 


25.6 


47.9 


14,150 


2.0 


13,165 


2.1 


10,600 


2.2 


7.5 


33.5 


12,662 


1.7 


12,250 


1.9 


9,000 


1.9 


3.4 


40.7 



11,493 1.6 10,732 1.7 



12,325 
8,356 
2,698 
1,359 



1.7 
1.2 
0.4 
0.2 



12,568 
9,426 
2,476 
1,257 



2.0 
1.5 
0.4 
0.2 



8,800 



8,200 
5,500 

2/ 

" 



1.1 



7.1 



1.7 


- 1.9 


50.3 


1.2 


-11.4 


51.9 





n/a 


n/a 





n/a 


n/a 



1,339 0.2 



1,219 0.2 



569,593 78.6 500,963 79.3 371,300 78.0 



n/a 



13.7 



48,735 
48,735 


6.7 

6.7 


39,881 
22,352 


6.3 
3.5 


44,900 
19,900 


9.4 

4.2 


22.2 
118.0 


n/a 


n/a 


17,529 


2.8 


25,000 


5.2 


n/a 


06,562 
49,658 
35,975 


14.7 
6.9 
4.9 


90,775 

40,498 
33,268 


14.4 
6.4 
5.3 


60,100 
27,100 
20,900 


12.6 
5.7 

4.4 


17.4 

22.6 

8.1 


12,427 


1.7 


8,765 


1.4 


5,600 


1.2 


41.8 


8,502 



1.2 



8,244 



1.3 




5,400 
1,1002/ 


1.1 
0.2 


3.1 

n/a 



n/a 



n/a 



TOTAL NET CASH RECEIPTS 724,890 100.0 631,619 100.0 476,300 100.0 

\J Investment transactions and other rotating receipts not included in "net" receipts. 
2/ Absorbed into other accounts in FY 1960. 

Source: Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, "Condensed Annual Report: 1965," p. 3. 

152 





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153 



No. 116 ALL ACTIVE BANKS IN MARYLAND 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES - 1965 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 



,694 


1,505 


12 


630 


1,250 


-50 


405 


532 


-12 



7o Change 
1965 1/ 1960 1965/1960 

Number of Banks 111 139 -20 

Total Assets or Liabilities 3,153 3,378 - 7 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages & Judgments 
U.S. Govt, and other Securities 
Cash & Balances with other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus, Undivided Profits, 

& Reserves 249 276 -24 

Total Deposits 2,842 3,051 - 7 

l/ Includes 1964 bank statistics. 

Source: U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, "Ninety -Eighth Annual Report: 
I960," Table 43, pp. 236-238. 



154 



No. 117 ALL ACTIVE NATIONAL BANKS IN MARYLAND 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES - 1965 and 1960 
(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 







% Change 


1965 


1960 


1965/1960 


49 


50 


- 2 


1,846 


1,274 


44 


923 


510 


80 


369 


458 


-20 


332 


285 


16 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages & Judgments 
U.S. Govt, and other Securities 
Cash & Balances with other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus, Undivided Profits, 

& Reserves 
Total Deposits 
Demand 
Time (including savings) 



Source: U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, "Ninety-Eighth Annual Report: 
1960," p. 161. 



152 


99 


53 


1,652 


1,160 


42 


1,065 


847 


25 


588 


313 


87 



155 



No. 118 ALL ACTIVE STATE COMMERCIAL BANKS IN MARYLAND 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES - 1965 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 



1965 


1960 


% Change 
1965/1960 


56 


83 


- 33 


515 


1,477 


-186 


276 

124 

57 


665 
553 
232 


-140 
-346 
-307 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages & Judgments 
U.S. Govt, and other Securities 
Cash & Balances with other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus, Undivided Profits, 

& Reserves 39 124 -218 

Total Deposits 468 1,330 -184 

Source: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty -Sixth Annual Report," 
1966, pp. 44 and 45. 



156 



No. 119 



ALL ACTIVE MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS IN MARYLAND 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES - 1965 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages 6c Judgments 
U.S. Govt, and other Securities 
Cash & Balances with other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Surplus, Undivided Profits, & Reserves 
Total Deposits 



1965 


1960 


7o Change 
1965/1960 


6 


6 


— 


792 


627 


26.3 


495 

137 

16 


331 

238 
15 


49.5 

-73.0 

6.6 


58 1/ 

722 " 


53 
561 


9.4 
28.6 



l/ Includes $37,930,000 of surplus or guaranty fund. 



Source: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Sixth Annual Report," 
1966, pp. 46 and 47. 



157 



No. 120 INDUSTRIAL FINANCE COMPANIES IN MARYLAND - 1965 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 



1965 


1960 


°L Change 
1965/1960 


350 


257 


36 


$258.9 


$132.9 


95 


$242.3 
$ 7.1 


$124.3 
$ 4.0 


95 
78 



Number of Licensees 

Total Assets or Liabilities & Capital 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans Receivable 
Cash (on hand and in banks) 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus, Undivided Profits, 

& Reserves 
Deferred Income 
Due Home Office, Holding Company or 

Affiliate 
Notes Payable (banks & others) 

Source: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Sixth Annual Report," June 
30, 1966, p. 20. 



25.3 


20.6 


23 


22.6 


7.8 


190 


160.6 


81.6 


97 


34.8 


20.2 


72 



158 



No. 121 CREDIT UNIONS IN MARYLAND - 1965 AND 1960 

(Money figures in millions of dollars as of Dec. 31) 



Number of Credit Unions 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 
Loans to Members 
Cash (on hand and in banks) 
Securities 

Selected Liabilities: 

Paid-in Shares, Reserve Funds, and Surplus 
Deposits 



Source: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Sixth Annual Report," 
1966, pp. 48 and 49. 



1965 


1960 


7o Change 
1965/1960 


39 


43 


- 10 


$36.9 


$23.5 


57 


$32.0 
$ 1.15 
$ .88 


$19.5 
$ .90 
$ 1.8 


64 

27 

-105 


$27.3 
1.65 


$18.3 
1.2 


49 
37 



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161 






cee p -'k Md. 



l*m> 



THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
OF THE STATE OF MARYLAND 



Ralph O. Dulany, Chairman 

Fruitland 

(Eastern Shore) 



Harry J. Barton 

Pinto 

(Western Maryland) 



Frank N. Hoffmann 
Hyattsville 
(Southern Maryland) 



William A. Chapman 
St. Mary's City 
(Southern Maryland) 



Harold J. Lipscomb 

Baltimore 

(At large) 



Tilton H. Dobbin 
Owings Mills 
(Central Maryland) 



Harry W. Rodgers, 
Baltimore 
(Baltimore City) 



Martin Dwyer 
Elkton 
(Eastern Shore) 



Irving H. Weil 

Frederick 

(Western Maryland) 



Col. H. Grady Gore 

Potomac 

(At large) 



A. V. Williams 

Baltimore 

(Central Maryland) 



Willard Hackerman 
Baltimore 
(Baltimore City) 



William A. Pate 
Secrefary - Director 



J8I01CIBCOUTB 




Published October, 1967 by 

MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Annapolis, Maryland 21401 



Md. statistical abstract 1967 



Maryland 
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USE IN THIS ROOM ONLY 

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